Herman Melville citáty

Herman Melville foto
8   23

Herman Melville

Datum narození: 1. srpen 1818
Datum úmrtí: 28. září 1891

Herman Melville byl americký realistický spisovatel a básník.

Díla

Bílá velryba
Herman Melville

„Lepší spát se střízlivým kanibalem, než opilým křesťanem.“

—  Herman Melville, kniha Bílá velryba

Originál: (en) Better sleep with a sober cannibal than a drunken Christian.
Zdroj: [Melville, Herman, 2012, Moby Dick, Cherry Hill Publishing, angličtina, 978-1-6207-900-69]

„The drama's done. Why then here does any one step forth?“

—  Herman Melville

Because one did survive the wreck.
Epilogue
Moby-Dick: or, the Whale (1851)

„And do not think, my boy, that because I, impulsively broke forth in jubillations over Shakspeare, that, therefore, I am of the number of the snobs who burn their tuns of rancid fat at his shrine. No, I would stand afar off & alone, & burn some pure Palm oil, the product of some overtopping trunk.“

—  Herman Melville

I would to God Shakspeare had lived later, & promenaded in Broadway. Not that I might have had the pleasure of leaving my card for him at the Astor, or made merry with him over a bowl of the fine Duyckinck punch; but that the muzzle which all men wore on their soul in the Elizebethan day, might not have intercepted Shakspers full articulations. For I hold it a verity, that even Shakspeare, was not a frank man to the uttermost. And, indeed, who in this intolerant universe is, or can be? But the Declaration of Independence makes a difference.—There, I have driven my horse so hard that I have made my inn before sundown.
Letter to Evert Augustus Duyckinck (3 March 1849); published in The Letters of Herman Melville (1960) edited by Merrell R. Davis and William H. Gilman, p. 79

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„Familiarity with danger makes a brave man braver, but less daring.“

—  Herman Melville, kniha White-Jacket

Zdroj: White-Jacket (1850), Ch. 23
Kontext: Familiarity with danger makes a brave man braver, but less daring. Thus with seamen: he who goes the oftenest round Cape Horn goes the most circumspectly.

„There is nothing nameable but that some men will undertake to do it for pay.“

—  Herman Melville, kniha Billy Budd, Sailor

Zdroj: Billy Budd, the Sailor (1891), Ch. 21
Kontext: Who in the rainbow can draw the line where the violet tint ends and the orange tint begins? Distinctly we see the difference of the colors, but where exactly does the one first blendingly enter into the other? So with sanity and insanity. In pronounced cases there is no question about them. But in some supposed cases, in various degrees supposedly less pronounced, to draw the exact line of demarcation few will undertake tho' for a fee some professional experts will. There is nothing nameable but that some men will undertake to do it for pay.

„All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks.“

—  Herman Melville

Ahab to Starbuck, in Ch. 36 : The Quarter-Deck
Moby-Dick: or, the Whale (1851)
Kontext: All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event — in the living act, the undoubted deed — there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth the mouldings of its features from behind the unreasoning mask.

„Whoever is not in the possession of leisure can hardly be said to possess independence.“

—  Herman Melville

Letter to Catherine G. Lansing (5 September 1877), published in The Melville Log : A Documentary Life of Herman Melville, 1819-1891 (1951) by Jay Leyda, Vol. 2, p. 765
Kontext: Whoever is not in the possession of leisure can hardly be said to possess independence. They talk of the dignity of work. Bosh. True Work is the necessity of poor humanity's earthly condition. The dignity is in leisure. Besides, 99 hundreths of all the work done in the world is either foolish and unnecessary, or harmful and wicked.

„We incline to think that God cannot explain His own secrets, and that He would like a little information upon certain points Himself. We mortals astonish Him as much as He us.“

—  Herman Melville

Letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne, including bits of a review of his work that he had written (c. 16 April 1851); published in Nathaniel Hawthorne and His WIfe Vol, I (1884) by Julian Hawthorne, Ch. VIII : Lenox, p. 388
Kontext: There is a certain tragic phase of humanity which, in our opinion, was never more powerfully embodied than by Hawthorne. We mean the tragedies of human thought in its own unbiassed, native, and profounder workings. We think that into no recorded mind has the intense feeling of the usable truth ever entered more deeply than into this man's. By usable truth, we mean the apprehension of the absolute condition of present things as they strike the eye of the man who fears them not, though they do their worst to him, — the man who, like Russia or the British Empire, declares himself a sovereign nature (in himself) amid the powers of heaven, hell, and earth. He may perish; but so long as he exists he insists upon treating with all Powers upon an equal basis. If any of those other Powers choose to withhold certain secrets, let them; that does not impair my sovereignty in myself; that does not make me tributary. And perhaps, after all, there is no secret. We incline to think that the Problem of the Universe is like the Freemason's mighty secret, so terrible to all children. It turns out, at last, to consist in a triangle, a mallet, and an apron, — nothing more! We incline to think that God cannot explain His own secrets, and that He would like a little information upon certain points Himself. We mortals astonish Him as much as He us. But it is this Being of the matter; there lies the knot with which we choke ourselves. As soon as you say Me, a God, a Nature, so soon you jump off from your stool and hang from the beam. Yes, that word is the hangman. Take God out of the dictionary, and you would have Him in the street.
There is the grand truth about Nathaniel Hawthorne. He says NO! in thunder; but the Devil himself cannot make him say yes. For all men who say yes, lie; and all men who say no,—why, they are in the happy condition of judicious, unincumbered travellers in Europe; they cross the frontiers into Eternity with nothing but a carpet-bag, — that is to say, the Ego. Whereas those yes-gentry, they travel with heaps of baggage, and, damn them! they will never get through the Custom House. What's the reason, Mr. Hawthorne, that in the last stages of metaphysics a fellow always falls to swearing so? I could rip an hour.

„I cannot tell you how thankful I am for your reminding me about the apocrypha here. For the moment, its being such escaped me.“

—  Herman Melville

Zdroj: The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade (1857), Ch. 45
Kontext: I cannot tell you how thankful I am for your reminding me about the apocrypha here. For the moment, its being such escaped me. Fact is, when all is bound up together, it's sometimes confusing. The uncanonical part should be bound distinct. And, now that I think of it, how well did those learned doctors who rejected for us this whole book of Sirach. I never read anything so calculated to destroy man's confidence in man. This son of Sirach even says — I saw it but just now: 'Take heed of thy friends'; not, observe, thy seeming friends, thy hypocritical friends, thy false friends, but thy friends, thy real friends — that is to say, not the truest friend in the world is to be implicitly trusted. Can Rochefoucault equal that? I should not wonder if his view of human nature, like Machiavelli's, was taken from this Son of Sirach. And to call it wisdom — the Wisdom of the Son of Sirach! Wisdom, indeed! What an ugly thing wisdom must be! Give me the folly that dimples the cheek, say I, rather than the wisdom that curdles the blood. But no, no; it ain't wisdom; it's apocrypha, as you say, sir. For how can that be trustworthy that teaches distrust?

„There is a certain tragic phase of humanity which, in our opinion, was never more powerfully embodied than by Hawthorne.“

—  Herman Melville

Letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne, including bits of a review of his work that he had written (c. 16 April 1851); published in Nathaniel Hawthorne and His WIfe Vol, I (1884) by Julian Hawthorne, Ch. VIII : Lenox, p. 388
Kontext: There is a certain tragic phase of humanity which, in our opinion, was never more powerfully embodied than by Hawthorne. We mean the tragedies of human thought in its own unbiassed, native, and profounder workings. We think that into no recorded mind has the intense feeling of the usable truth ever entered more deeply than into this man's. By usable truth, we mean the apprehension of the absolute condition of present things as they strike the eye of the man who fears them not, though they do their worst to him, — the man who, like Russia or the British Empire, declares himself a sovereign nature (in himself) amid the powers of heaven, hell, and earth. He may perish; but so long as he exists he insists upon treating with all Powers upon an equal basis. If any of those other Powers choose to withhold certain secrets, let them; that does not impair my sovereignty in myself; that does not make me tributary. And perhaps, after all, there is no secret. We incline to think that the Problem of the Universe is like the Freemason's mighty secret, so terrible to all children. It turns out, at last, to consist in a triangle, a mallet, and an apron, — nothing more! We incline to think that God cannot explain His own secrets, and that He would like a little information upon certain points Himself. We mortals astonish Him as much as He us. But it is this Being of the matter; there lies the knot with which we choke ourselves. As soon as you say Me, a God, a Nature, so soon you jump off from your stool and hang from the beam. Yes, that word is the hangman. Take God out of the dictionary, and you would have Him in the street.
There is the grand truth about Nathaniel Hawthorne. He says NO! in thunder; but the Devil himself cannot make him say yes. For all men who say yes, lie; and all men who say no,—why, they are in the happy condition of judicious, unincumbered travellers in Europe; they cross the frontiers into Eternity with nothing but a carpet-bag, — that is to say, the Ego. Whereas those yes-gentry, they travel with heaps of baggage, and, damn them! they will never get through the Custom House. What's the reason, Mr. Hawthorne, that in the last stages of metaphysics a fellow always falls to swearing so? I could rip an hour.

„Leviathan is not the biggest fish; — I have heard of Krakens.“

—  Herman Melville

Letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne (July 1851); published in Memories of Hawthorne (1897) by Rose Hawthorne Lathrop, p. 158
Kontext: I am heartily sorry I ever wrote anything about you — it was paltry. Lord, when shall we be done growing? As long as we have anything more to do, we have done nothing. So, now, let us add Moby-Dick to our blessing, and step from that. Leviathan is not the biggest fish; — I have heard of Krakens.

„In the light of that martial code whereby it was formally to be judged, innocence and guilt personified in Claggart and Budd in effect changed places.“

—  Herman Melville, kniha Billy Budd, Sailor

Zdroj: Billy Budd, the Sailor (1891), Ch. 21
Kontext: In the light of that martial code whereby it was formally to be judged, innocence and guilt personified in Claggart and Budd in effect changed places. In a legal view the apparent victim of the tragedy was he who had sought to victimize a man blameless; and the indisputable deed of the latter, navally regarded, constituted the most heinous of military crimes.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Podobní autoři

Ralph Waldo Emerson foto
Ralph Waldo Emerson140
americký filozof, esejista a básník
Robert Louis Stevenson foto
Robert Louis Stevenson20
skotský romanopisec, básník, esejista a autor cestopisů
Ambrose Bierce foto
Ambrose Bierce80
americký novinář, spisovatel novel, fabulist a satirik
Walt Whitman foto
Walt Whitman19
americký básník, esejista a novinář
Theodor Fontane foto
Theodor Fontane17
německý prozaik a básník
Oliver Wendell Holmes foto
Oliver Wendell Holmes13
básník, esejista, lékař
Henry David Thoreau foto
Henry David Thoreau131
americký autor a přírodovědec
Edgar Allan Poe foto
Edgar Allan Poe46
americký spisovatel
Oscar Wilde foto
Oscar Wilde575
dramatik, prozaik a básník
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow foto
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow13
americký básník
Dnešní výročí
Sofie Podlipská foto
Sofie Podlipská3
česká spisovatelka a překladatelka 1833 - 1897
Emily Dickinson foto
Emily Dickinson16
americká básnířka 1830 - 1886
Arthur Schnitzler foto
Arthur Schnitzler9
rakouský lékař a spisovatel 1862 - 1931
Madeleine Albrightová foto
Madeleine Albrightová28
bývalá americká ministryně zahraničí 1937
Dalších 51 dnešních výročí
Podobní autoři
Ralph Waldo Emerson foto
Ralph Waldo Emerson140
americký filozof, esejista a básník
Robert Louis Stevenson foto
Robert Louis Stevenson20
skotský romanopisec, básník, esejista a autor cestopisů
Ambrose Bierce foto
Ambrose Bierce80
americký novinář, spisovatel novel, fabulist a satirik
Walt Whitman foto
Walt Whitman19
americký básník, esejista a novinář
Theodor Fontane foto
Theodor Fontane17
německý prozaik a básník