„The object of the artist is the creation of the beautiful. What the beautiful is is another question.“

—  James Joyce, kniha A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Zdroj: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Poslední aktualizace 3. června 2021. Historie
James Joyce foto
James Joyce18
irský prozaik a básník 1882 - 1941

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„An artist's concern is to capture beauty wherever he finds it.“

—  Kazuo Ishiguro, kniha An Artist of the Floating World

Zdroj: An Artist of the Floating World

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„The intensity with which a subject is grasped (still life's, portraits, or creations of the imagination) – that is what makes for beauty in art.“

—  Paula Modersohn-Becker German artist 1876 - 1907

excerpt of her Journal, Worpswede 1899; as quoted in Voicing our visions, – Writings by women artists; ed. Mara R. Witzling, Universe New York, 1991, p. 198
1899

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„The real and proper question is: why is it beautiful?“

—  Annie Dillard, kniha Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

Zdroj: Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

Walt Whitman foto

„It is a beautiful truth that all men contain something of the artist in them. And perhaps it is the case that the greatest artists live and die, the world and themselves alike ignorant what they possess.“

—  Walt Whitman American poet, essayist and journalist 1819 - 1892

"Talk to an Art-Union (A Brooklyn fragment)" http://www.aol.bartleby.com/229/4011.html (1839); later delivered as a lecture at the Brooklyn Art Union (31 March 1851) and printed in the Brooklyn Daily Advertizer (3 April 1851)
Kontext: It is a beautiful truth that all men contain something of the artist in them. And perhaps it is the case that the greatest artists live and die, the world and themselves alike ignorant what they possess. Who would not mourn that an ample palace, of surpassingly graceful architecture, fill’d with luxuries, and embellish’d with fine pictures and sculpture, should stand cold and still and vacant, and never be known or enjoy’d by its owner? Would such a fact as this cause your sadness? Then be sad. For there is a palace, to which the courts of the most sumptuous kings are but a frivolous patch, and, though it is always waiting for them, not one of its owners ever enters there with any genuine sense of its grandeur and glory.
I think of few heroic actions, which cannot be traced to the artistical impulse. He who does great deeds, does them from his innate sensitiveness to moral beauty.

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„Beautiful is what we see, More Beautiful is what we know, most Beautiful by far is what we don't.“

—  Nicolas Steno Pioneer in anatomy and geology, bishop 1638 - 1686

quoted by Addison Anderson in a TED-Ed lesson. https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-most-groundbreaking-scientist-you-ve-never-heard-of-addison-anderson

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„People say, “Artist, study nature!” But it is no small matter to develop what is noble out of what is common, beauty out of what lacks form.“

—  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe German writer, artist, and politician 1749 - 1832

Man sagt: „Studire, Künstler, die Natur!”
Es ist aber keine Kleinigkeit, aus dem Gemeinen das Edle, aus der Unform das Schöne zu entwickeln.
Maxim 191, trans. Stopp
Maxims and Reflections (1833)

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„Beauty, my dear Sir, is not so much a quality of the object beheld, as an effect in him who beholds it. If our sight were longer or shorter, or if our constitution were different, what now appears beautiful to us would seem misshapen, and what we now think misshapen we should regard as beautiful.“

—  Baruch Spinoza Dutch philosopher 1632 - 1677

Letter to Hugo Boxel (Oct. 1674) The Chief Works of Benedict de Spinoza (1891) Tr. R. H. M. Elwes, Vol. 2, Letter 58 (54).
Kontext: Beauty, my dear Sir, is not so much a quality of the object beheld, as an effect in him who beholds it. If our sight were longer or shorter, or if our constitution were different, what now appears beautiful to us would seem misshapen, and what we now think misshapen we should regard as beautiful. The most beautiful hand seen through the microscope will appear horrible. Some things are beautiful at a distance, but ugly near; thus things regarded in themselves, and in relation to God, are neither ugly nor beautiful. Therefore, he who says that God has created the world, so that it might be beautiful, is bound to adopt one of the two alternatives, either that God created the world for the sake of men's pleasure and eyesight, or else that He created men's pleasure and eyesight for the sake of the world. Now, whether we adopt the former or the latter of these views, how God could have furthered His object by the creation of ghosts, I cannot see. Perfection and imperfection are names which do not differ much from the names beauty and ugliness.<!--p. 382

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