„The absence of limitations is the enemy of art.“

Poslední aktualizace 7. května 2019. Historie
Orson Welles foto
Orson Welles10
americký herec, režisér, spisovatel a producent 1915 - 1985

Podobné citáty

George Bernard Shaw foto

„Consistency is the enemy of enterprise, just as symmetry is the enemy of art.“

—  George Bernard Shaw Irish playwright 1856 - 1950

As quoted in Bernard Shaw : The Lure of Fantasy (1991) by Michael Holroyd
1940s and later

Ben Jonson foto

„Art hath an enemy call'd ignorance.“

—  Ben Jonson, Every Man out of His Humour

Every Man out of His Humour (1598), Act I, scene 1

Georges Braque foto

„In art progress consists not in extension but in the knowledge of its limits.“

—  Georges Braque French painter and sculptor 1882 - 1963

Quote from the review 'Nord-Sud', December 1917
a remark of Braque's writings, he wrote during his long convalescence in the hospital, after he was seriously wounded in World War 1, in 1915
1908 - 1920

Elfriede Jelinek foto
Ray Bradbury foto
Flannery O’Connor foto
G. K. Chesterton foto
Cyril Connolly foto

„There is no more sombre enemy of good art than the pram in the hall.“

—  Cyril Connolly, kniha Enemies of Promise

Zdroj: Enemies of Promise (1938), Part 2: The Charlock’s Shade, Ch. 14: The Charlock’s Shade (p. 116)

Pablo Picasso foto

„Art is not made to decorate rooms. It is an offensive weapon in the defense against the enemy.“

—  Pablo Picasso Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and stage designer 1881 - 1973

La peinture n'est pas faite pour décorer des appartements. C'est un instrument de guerre offensive et défensive contre l'ennemi.
La pintura no se ha inventado para adornar las habitaciones. La pintura es un arma ofensiva, en la defensa contra el enemigo.
Les lettres françaises (1943-03-24).
Quotes, 1940's

William Goldman foto
Daniel Barenboim foto

„Music is the art of the imaginary par excellence, an art free of all limits imposed by words, an art that touches the depth of human existence, and art of sounds that crosses all borders.“

—  Daniel Barenboim Israeli Argentine-born pianist and conductor 1942

Statement at the .
Kontext: Despite the fact that as an art, music cannot compromise its principles, and politics, on the other hand, is the art of compromise, when politics transcends the limits of the present existence and ascents to the higher sphere of the possible, it can be joined there by music. Music is the art of the imaginary par excellence, an art free of all limits imposed by words, an art that touches the depth of human existence, and art of sounds that crosses all borders. As such, music can take the feelings and imagination of Israelis and Palestinians to new unimaginable spheres.

Ambrose Bierce foto
Julien Offray de La Mettrie foto
William Carlos Williams foto

„Being an art form, verse cannot be "free" in the sense of having no limitations or guiding principle.“

—  William Carlos Williams American poet 1883 - 1963

As quoted in Free Verse. Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics 2nd ed (1975)
General sources

Al-Mansur foto
Claude Adrien Helvétius foto

„Discipline is, in a manner, nothing else but the art of inspiring the soldiers with greater fear of their officers than of the enemy.“

—  Claude Adrien Helvétius French philosopher 1715 - 1771

De l'esprit or, Essays on the Mind, and Its Several Faculties (1758)
Kontext: Discipline is, in a manner, nothing else but the art of inspiring the soldiers with greater fear of their officers than of the enemy. This fear has often the effect of courage: but it cannot prevail against the fierce and obstinate valor of people animated by fanaticism, or warm love of their country.

Gustave Flaubert foto

„In proportion as a community comes to substitute a qualitative for a quantitative standard of living, it escapes the limitations imposed by matter upon man. Art knows no restrictions of space or size, and in proportion as we attain the art of living we shall be likewise free.“

—  J.A. Hobson English economist, social scientist and critic of imperialism 1858 - 1940

The Evolution of Modern Capitalism: A Study of Machine Production (1906), Ch. XVII Civilisation and Industrial Development
Kontext: The case is a simple one. A mere increase in the variety of our material consumption relieves the strain imposed upon man by the limits of the material universe, for such variety enables him to utilise a larger proportion of the aggregate of matter. But in proportion as we add to mere variety a higher appreciation of those adaptations of matter which are due to human skill, and which we call Art, we pass outside the limits of matter and are no longer the slaves of roods and acres and a law of diminishing returns. So long as we continue to raise more men who demand more food and clothes and fuel, we are subject to the limitations of the material universe, and what we get ever costs us more and benefits us less. But when we cease to demand more, and begin to demand better, commodities, more delicate, highly finished and harmonious, we can increase the enjoyment without adding to the cost or exhausting the store. What artist would not laugh at the suggestion that the materials of his art, his colours, clay, marble, or what else he wrought in, might fail and his art come to an end? When we are dealing with qualitative, i. e. artistic, goods, we see at once how an infinite expenditure of labour may be given, an infinite satisfaction taken, from the meagrest quantity of matter and space. In proportion as a community comes to substitute a qualitative for a quantitative standard of living, it escapes the limitations imposed by matter upon man. Art knows no restrictions of space or size, and in proportion as we attain the art of living we shall be likewise free. <!--section 16, p. 431

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“