„.— A person must have one or the other. Either a cheerful disposition by nature, or a disposition made cheerful by art and knowledge.“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche, kniha Human, All Too Human
Friedrich Nietzsche foto
Friedrich Nietzsche194
německý filozof, spisovatel 1844 - 1900

Podobné citáty

Irving Kristol foto
Tsunetomo Yamamoto foto

„To give a person an opinion one must first judge well whether that person is of the disposition to receive it or not.“

—  Tsunetomo Yamamoto, kniha Hagakure
Hagakure (c. 1716), Context: To give a person an opinion one must first judge well whether that person is of the disposition to receive it or not. One must become close with him and make sure that he continually trusts one's word. Approaching subjects that are dear to him, seek the best way to speak and to be well understood. Context: To give a person one's opinion and correct his faults is an important thing. It is compassionate and comes first in matters of service. But the way of doing this is extremely difficult. To discover the good and bad points of a person is an easy thing, and to give an opinion concerning them is easy, too. For the most part, people think that they are being kind by saying the things that others find distasteful or difficult to say. But if it is not received well, they think that there is nothing more to be done. This is completely worthless. It is the same as bringing shame to a person by slandering him. It is nothing more than getting it off one's chest. To give a person an opinion one must first judge well whether that person is of the disposition to receive it or not. One must become close with him and make sure that he continually trusts one's word. Approaching subjects that are dear to him, seek the best way to speak and to be well understood. Judge the occasion, and determine whether it is better by letter or at the time of leave-taking. Praise his good points and use every device to encourage him, perhaps by talking about one's own faults without touching on his, but so that they will occur to him. Have him receive this in the way that a man would drink water when his throat is dry, and it will be an opinion that will correct faults. This is extremely difficult. If a person's fault is a habit of some years prior, by and large it won't be remedied. I have had this experience myself. To be intimate with all one's comrades, correcting each other's faults, and being of one mind to be of use to the master is the great compassion of a retainer. By bringing shame to a person, how could one expect to make him a better man? Variant translation: It is very important to give advice to a man to help him mend his ways. It is a compassionate and important duty. However, it is extremely difficult to comprehend how this advice should be given. It is easy to recognise the good and bad points in others. Generally it is considered a kindness in helping people with things they hate or find difficult to say. However, one impracticality is that if people do not take in this advice they will think that there is nothing they should change. The same applies when we try to create shame in others by speaking badly of them. It seems outwardly that we are just complaining about them. One must get to know the person in question. Keep after him and get him to put his trust in you. Find out what interests he has. When you write to him or before you part company, you should express concrete examples of your own faults and get him to recall to mind whether or not he has the same problems. Also positively praise his qualities. It is important that he takes in your comments like a man thirsting for water. It is difficult to give such advice. We cannot easily correct our defects and weak points as they are dyed deeply within us. I have had bitter experience of this.

Lance Armstrong foto

„A boo is a lot louder than a cheer, if you have 10 people cheering and one person booing all you hear is the booing.“

—  Lance Armstrong professional cyclist from the USA 1971
As quoted in "King of the Hill" by Kelli Anderson in Sports Illustrated (5 August 2002) http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/features/2002/sportsman/flashbacks/lance/king_of_the_hill

Thomas Mann foto

„I have an epic, not a dramatic nature. My disposition and my desires call for peace to spin my thread, for a steady rhythm in life and art.“

—  Thomas Mann German novelist, and 1929 Nobel Prize laureate 1875 - 1955
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 December 1929) http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1929/mann-speech.html

Frederick Douglass foto
Joseph Addison foto
James Joyce foto

„Art is the human disposition of sensible or intelligible matter for an aesthetic end.“

—  James Joyce, kniha A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Notebook entry, Paris (28 March 1903), printed in James Joyce: Occasional, Critical and Political Writing (2002) edited by Kevin Barry [Oxford University Press, 2002, <small> ISBN 0-192-83353-7</small>], p. 104

Eli Siegel foto
Adam Smith foto

„By nature a philosopher is not in genius and disposition half so different from a street porter“

—  Adam Smith Scottish moral philosopher and political economist 1723 - 1790
The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Context: By nature a philosopher is not in genius and disposition half so different from a street porter, as a mastiff is from a greyhound Chapter II, p. 17.

Musa al-Kadhim foto

„Cheerfulness and good nature, purge hatred and rancour.“

—  Musa al-Kadhim Seventh of the Twelve Imams and regarded by Sunnis as a renowned scholar 745 - 799
General, Muhammad Kulayni, Usul al-Kafi, vol.3, p. 162.

Edmund Burke foto

„You have theories enough concerning the Rights of Men. It may not be amiss to add a small degree of attention to their Nature and disposition.“

—  Edmund Burke Anglo-Irish statesman 1729 - 1797
1780s, Letter to Charles-Jean-François Depont (November 1789), quoted in Alfred Cobban and Robert A. Smith (eds.), The Correspondence of Edmund Burke, Volume VI: July 1789–December 1791 (Cambridge University Press, 1967), p. 46

John Milner Fothergill foto

„All the bloodshed caused by the warlike disposition of Napoleon is as nothing compared to the myriads of persons who have sunk into their graves through a misplaced confidence in the value of beef tea.“

—  John Milner Fothergill British physician and medical writer 1841 - 1888
Quoted in Shall We Slay to Eat? https://books.google.it/books?id=WNQvAQAAMAAJ by John Harvey Kellogg, Good Health Publishing Company, 1899, p. 124.

Joseph Smith, Jr. foto
Isaac Parker foto

„The object of punishment is to… lift the man up; to stamp out his bad nature and wicked disposition.“

—  Isaac Parker American politician 1838 - 1896
Letter to U.S. Attorney General Augustus Hill Garland (May 27, 1885).

Jack Vance foto
Charles Robert Leslie foto
Samuel Johnson foto
Anna Laetitia Barbauld foto
Jerry Coyne foto
Henryk Sienkiewicz foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

x