„We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine;
But seas between us broad have roared
since days of long ago.“

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Robert Burns7
1759 - 1796
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„We have lingered in the chambers of the sea
By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown
Till human voices wake us, and we drown.“

— T.S. Eliot, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock and Other Poems
Context: I grow old … I grow old... I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled. Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare to eat a peach? I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each. I do not think that they will sing to me. I have seen them riding seaward on the waves Combing the white hair of the waves blown back When the wind blows the water white and black. We have lingered in the chambers of the sea By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown Till human voices wake us, and we drown.

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„Now because 18 months ago the first dawn, 3 months ago broad daylight but a very few days ago the full sun of the most highly remarkable spectacle has risen — nothing holds me back.“

— Johannes Kepler German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer 1571 - 1630
Context: Now because 18 months ago the first dawn, 3 months ago broad daylight but a very few days ago the full sun of the most highly remarkable spectacle has risen — nothing holds me back. I can give myself up to the sacred frenzy, I can have the insolence to make a full confession to mortal men that I have stolen the golden vessel of the Egyptians to make from them a tabernacle for my God far from the confines of the land of Egypt. If you forgive me I shall rejoice; if you are angry, I shall bear it; I am indeed casting the die and writing the book, either for my contemporaries or for posterity to read, it matters not which: let the book await its reader for a hundred years; God himself has waited six thousand years for his work to be seen. Book V, Introduction Variant translation: It may well wait a century for a reader, as God has waited six thousand years for an observer. As quoted in The Martyrs of Science; or, the Lives of Galileo, Tycho Brahe, and Kepler (1841) by David Brewster, p. 197. This has sometimes been misquoted as "It may be well to wait a century for a reader, as God has waited six thousand years for an observer." Variant translation: I feel carried away and possessed by an unutterable rapture over the divine spectacle of heavenly harmony... I write a book for the present time, or for posterity. It is all the same to me. It may wait a hundred years for its readers, as God has also waited six thousand years for an onlooker. As quoted in Calculus. Multivariable (2006) by Steven G. Krantz and Brian E. Blank. p. 126 Variant translation: I am stealing the golden vessels of the Egyptians to build a tabernacle to my God from them, far far away from the boundaries of Egypt. If you forgive me, I shall rejoice.; if you are enraged with me, I shall bear it. See, I cast the die, and I write the book. Whether it is to be read by the people of the present or of the future makes no difference: let it await its reader for a hundred years, if God himself has stood ready for six thousand years for one to study him. Unsourced translation

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„An island-farm — broad seas of corn
Stirred by the wandering breath of morn —
The happy spot where I was born.“

— Lewis Carroll English writer, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer 1832 - 1898
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„And with the morn those angel faces smile
Which I have loved long since and lost awhile.“

— John Henry Newman English cleric and cardinal 1801 - 1890
The Pillar of the Cloud http://www.bartleby.com/236/75.html, st. 3 (1833).

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