„That which is, grows, while that which is not, becomes.“

—  Galén

Galen, On the Natural Faculties, Bk. 2, sect. 3; cited from Arthur John Brock (trans.) On the Natural Faculties (London: Heinemann, 1963) p. 139.

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Galén foto
Galén3
římský lékař, chirurg a filozof 129 - 216

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