„There is another world, but it is in this one.“

—  Paul Éluard, Œuvres complètes, vol. 1, Gallimard, 1968.
Původní znění

Il y a assurément un autre monde, mais il est dans celui-ci...

Paul Éluard foto
Paul Éluard14
francouzský básník 1895 - 1952
Reklama

Podobné citáty

George Herbert foto

„Man is one world, and hath
Another to attend him.“

—  George Herbert Welsh-born English poet, orator and Anglican priest 1593 - 1633
Man, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

Reklama
Chris Anderson foto
Roberto Mangabeira Unger foto
William Gibson foto
Clifford D. Simak foto
Reklama
Jonathan Safran Foer foto
William Saroyan foto

„Every man alive in the world is a beggar of one sort or another, every last one of them, great and small.“

—  William Saroyan American writer 1908 - 1981
Context: Every man alive in the world is a beggar of one sort or another, every last one of them, great and small. The priest begs God for grace, and the king begs something for something. Sometimes he begs the people for loyalty, sometimes he begs God to forgive him. No man in the world can have endured ten years without having begged God to forgive him. "The Beggars" in The William Saroyan Reader (1958)

Ali al-Hadi foto

„The world is like a market; one community reaps benefit in it while another one faces loss“

—  Ali al-Hadi imam 829 - 868
Context: The world is like a market; one community reaps benefit in it while another one faces loss. Majlisi, Bihārul Anwār, vol.78, p. 368.

Reklama
H.L. Mencken foto

„What the world turns to, when it has been cured of one error, is usually simply another error, and maybe one worse than the first one.“

—  H.L. Mencken American journalist and writer 1880 - 1956
Context: Truth, indeed, is something that is believed in completely only by persons who have never tried personally to pursue it to its fastness and grab it by the tail. It is the adoration of second-rate men — men who always receive it as second-hand. Pedagogues believe in immutable truths and spend their lives trying to determine them and propagate them; the intellectual progress of man consists largely of a concerted effort to block and destroy their enterprise. Nine times out of ten, in the arts as in life, there is actually no truth to be discovered; there is only error to be exposed. In whole departments of human inquiry it seems to me quite unlikely that the truth ever will be discovered. Nevertheless, the rubber-stamp thinking of the world always makes the assumption that the exposure of an error is identical with the discovery of truth — that error and truth are simply opposites. They are nothing of the sort. What the world turns to, when it has been cured of one error, is usually simply another error, and maybe one worse than the first one. This is the whole history of the intellect in brief. The average man of today does not believe in precisely the same imbecilities that the Greek of the Fourth Century before Christ believed in, but the things that he does believe in are often quite as idiotic. Perhaps this statement is a bit too sweeping. There is, year by year, a gradual accumulation of what may be called, provisionally, truths — there is a slow accretion of ideas that somehow manage to meet all practicable human tests, and so survive. But even so, it is risky to call them absolute truths. All that one may safely say of them is that no one, as yet, has demonstrated that they are errors. Soon or late, if experience teaches us anything, they are likely to succumb too. The profoundest truths of the Middle Ages are now laughed at by schoolboys. The profoundest truths of democracy will be laughed at, a few centuries hence, even by school-teachers. Ch. 3 "Footnote on Criticism", pp. 85-104

Vladimir Lenin foto
Osip Mandelstam foto
Alexandre Dumas foto

„There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more“

—  Alexandre Dumas French writer and dramatist, father of the homonym writer and dramatist 1802 - 1870
Chapter 117 http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Count_of_Monte_Cristo/Chapter_117