„An unlucky rich man is more capable of satisfying his desires and of riding out disaster when it strikes, but a lucky man is better off than him…He is the one who deserves to be described as happy. But until he is dead, you had better refrain from calling him happy, and just call him fortunate.“

—  Solón

Herodotus (trans. Robin Waterfield) The Histories Bk. 1, ch. 32, pp. 15-16.

Převzato z Wikiquote. Poslední aktualizace 3. června 2021. Historie
Solón foto
Solón13
aténský zákonodárce -638 - -558 př. n. l.

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