„Not bodies produce sensations, but element-complexes (sensation-complexes) constitute the bodies. When the physicist considers the bodies as the permanent reality, the `elements' as the transient appearance, he does not realise that all `bodies' are only mental symbols for element-complexes“

—  Ernst Mach, 20th century, The Analysis of Sensations (1902), sensation-complexes p. 23, as quoted in Lenin as Philosopher: A Critical Examination of the Philosophical Basis of Leninism (1948) by Anton Pannekoek, p. 33
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Ernst Mach2
český fyzik a vysokoškolský pedagog 1838 - 1916
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