„I would rather die having spoken in my manner, than speak in your manner and live. For neither in war nor yet in law ought any man use every way of escaping death. For often in battle there is no doubt that if a man will throw away his arms, and fall on his knees before his pursuers, he may escape death, if a man is willing to say or do anything. The difficulty, my friends, is not in avoiding death, but in avoiding unrighteousness; for that runs deeper than death.“

—  Sókratés

38e–39a
Plato, Apology

Převzato z Wikiquote. Poslední aktualizace 3. června 2021. Historie
Sókratés foto
Sókratés69
klasický řecký filozof -470 - -399 př. n. l.

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