„Ah, how unjust to Nature and himself
Is thoughtless, thankless, inconsistent man!“

—  Edward Young, Night-Thoughts, Night-Thoughts (1742–1745), Night II, Line 112.
Edward Young foto
Edward Young3
1683 - 1765
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Podobné citáty

Ethan Allen foto

„An unjust composition never fails to contain error and falsehood. Therefore an unjust connection of ideas is not derived from nature, but from the imperfect composition of man.“

—  Ethan Allen American general 1738 - 1789
Reason: The Only Oracle Of Man (1784), Context: An unjust composition never fails to contain error and falsehood. Therefore an unjust connection of ideas is not derived from nature, but from the imperfect composition of man. Misconnection of ideas is the same as misjudging, and has no positive existence, being merely a creature of the imagination; but nature and truth are real and uniform; and the rational mind by reasoning, discerns the uniformity, and is thereby enabled to make a just composition of ideas, which will stand the test of truth. But the fantastical illuminations of the credulous and superstitious part of mankind, proceed from weakness, and as far as they take place in the world subvert the religion of REASON, NATURE and TRUTH. Ch. XIII Section II - Of The Importance of the Exercise of Reason, and Practice of Morality, in order to the Happiness of Mankind

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George Washington foto

„It will be found an unjust and unwise jealousy, to deny a man the liberty he hath by nature upon a supposition that he may abuse it.“

—  George Washington first President of the United States 1732 - 1799
Misattributed, Oliver Cromwell, letter to Walter Dundas, 12 September 1650; this is also a recent misattribution.

„The natural distribution is neither just nor unjust; nor is it unjust that persons are born into society at some particular position. These are simply natural facts. What is just and unjust is the way that institutions deal with these facts.“

—  John Rawls, A Theory of Justice
A Theory of Justice (1971; 1975; 1999), Context: Occasionally this reflection is offered as an excuse for ignoring injustice, as if the refusal to acquiesce in injustice is on a par with being unable to accept death. The natural distribution is neither just nor unjust; nor is it unjust that persons are born into society at some particular position. These are simply natural facts. What is just and unjust is the way that institutions deal with these facts. Context: We may reject the contention that the ordering of institutions is always defective because the distribution of natural talents and the contingencies of social circumstance are unjust, and this injustice must inevitably carry over to human arrangements. Occasionally this reflection is offered as an excuse for ignoring injustice, as if the refusal to acquiesce in injustice is on a par with being unable to accept death. The natural distribution is neither just nor unjust; nor is it unjust that persons are born into society at some particular position. These are simply natural facts. What is just and unjust is the way that institutions deal with these facts. Aristocratic and caste societies are unjust because they make these contingencies the ascriptive basis for belonging to more or less enclosed and privileged social classes. The basic structure of these societies incorporates the arbitrariness found in nature. But there is no necessity for men to resign themselves to these contingencies. The social system is not an unchangeable order beyond human control but a pattern of human action. In justice as fairness men agree to avail themselves of the accidents of nature and social circumstance only when doing so is for the common benefit. The two principles are a fair way of meeting the arbitrariness of fortune; and while no doubt imperfect in other ways, the institutions which satisfy these principles are just. Chapter II, Section 14, pg. 87-88

Hans Arp foto

„[art] urges man to identify himself with nature.“

—  Hans Arp Alsatian, sculptor, painter, poet and abstract artist 1886 - 1966
1940s, Abstract Art, Concrete Art (c. 1942), p. 118

Joseph Addison foto

„Mutability of temper and inconsistency with ourselves is the greatest weakness of human nature.“

—  Joseph Addison politician, writer and playwright 1672 - 1719
The Spectator (1711–1714), No. 162 (5 September 1711).

Napoleon I of France foto
Martin Luther King, Jr. foto
George Eliot foto

„The yoke a man creates for himself by wrong-doing will breed hate in the kindliest nature;...“

—  George Eliot English novelist, journalist and translator 1819 - 1880
Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe (1861), Chapter 3 (at page 32)

David Berg foto
Rachel Carson foto
Harriet Beecher Stowe foto
Bill Nye foto

„Nature is bottom up. It's compelling and complex, and it fills me with joy and it's inconsistent with the top down view.“

—  Bill Nye American science educator, comedian, television host, actor, writer, scientist and former mechanical engineer 1955
[NewsBank, 3, Sarah Whitman, Age-old feud: In the beginning, Tampa Bay Times, Florida, February 7, 2014]

Martin Buber foto
Albert Einstein foto

„How does it happen that a properly endowed natural scientist comes to concern himself with epistemology?“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955
1910s, Context: How does it happen that a properly endowed natural scientist comes to concern himself with epistemology? Is there not some more valuable work to be done in his specialty? That's what I hear many of my colleagues ask, and I sense it from many more. But I cannot share this sentiment. When I think about the ablest students whom I have encountered in my teaching — that is, those who distinguish themselves by their independence of judgment and not just their quick-wittedness — I can affirm that they had a vigorous interest in epistemology. They happily began discussions about the goals and methods of science, and they showed unequivocally, through tenacious defense of their views, that the subject seemed important to them. Concepts that have proven useful in ordering things easily achieve such authority over us that we forget their earthly origins and accept them as unalterable givens. [Begriffe, welche sich bei der Ordnung der Dinge als nützlich erwiesen haben, erlangen über uns leicht eine solche Autorität, dass wir ihres irdischen Ursprungs vergessen und sie als unabänderliche Gegebenheiten hinnehmen. ] Thus they might come to be stamped as "necessities of thought," "a priori givens," etc. The path of scientific progress is often made impassable for a long time by such errors. [Der Weg des wissenschaftlichen Fortschritts wird durch solche Irrtümer oft für längere Zeit ungangbar gemacht. ] Therefore it is by no means an idle game if we become practiced in analysing long-held commonplace concepts and showing the circumstances on which their justification and usefulness depend, and how they have grown up, individually, out of the givens of experience. Thus their excessive authority will be broken. They will be removed if they cannot be properly legitimated, corrected if their correlation with given things be far too superfluous, or replaced if a new system can be established that we prefer for whatever reason. Obituary for physicist and philosopher Ernst Mach (Nachruf auf Ernst Mach), Physikalische Zeitschrift 17 (1916), p. 101

Letitia Elizabeth Landon foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“