„My spirit is old; and some black lot awaits me
On my long road.
Some dream accurst, inveterate, suffocates me
Still with its load.
So young – yet hosts of dreadful thoughts appal me,
Sick and opprest.
Come! and from shadowy phantoms disenthral me,
Friend.“

"My Spirit is Old" (1899); translation from Oliver Elton Verse from Pushkin and Others (London: E. Arnold, 1935) p. 175.

Poslední aktualizace 22. května 2020. Historie
Alexandr Alexandrovič Blok foto
Alexandr Alexandrovič Blok6
básník 1880 - 1921

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„Life's visions are vanished, it's dreams are no more.
Dear friends of my bosom, why bathed in tears?
I go to my fathers; I welcome the shore,
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Kontext: p>I buoyed me on the wings of dream,
Above the world of sense;
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And fathom the Immense;
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I feel the vast pulse throb in mine.</p

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