„On the bank of the Nile opposite Old Cairo is the place known as The Garden, which is a pleasure park and promenade, containing many beautiful gardens, for the people of Cairo are given to pleasure and amusements. I witnessed a fete once in Cairo for the sultan's recovery from a fractured hand; all the merchants decorated their bazaars and had rich stuffs, ornaments and silken fabrics hanging in their shops for several days.“

Travels in Asia and Africa (Rehalã of Ibn Battûta)

Poslední aktualizace 22. května 2020. Historie

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Farah Pahlavi foto
Ibn Battuta foto
Francis Bacon foto
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Ibn Battuta foto
Clive Staples Lewis foto

„Thus up from the garden to the Gardener, from the sword to the Smith. to the life-giving Life and the Beauty that makes beautiful.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis, kniha A Grief Observed

A Grief Observed (1961)
Kontext: But perhaps I lack the gift. I see I've described her as being like a sword. That's true as far as it goes. But utterly inadequate by itself, and misleading. I ought to have said 'But also like a garden. Like a nest of gardens, wall within wall, hedge within hedge, more secret, more full of fragrant and fertile life, the further you explore.'
And then, of her, and every created thing I praise, I should say 'in some way, in its unique way, like Him who made it.'
Thus up from the garden to the Gardener, from the sword to the Smith. to the life-giving Life and the Beauty that makes beautiful.

Louis Sullivan foto

„And so shall your garden grow; from the rich soil of the humanities it will rise up and unfold in beauty in the pure air of the spirit.“

—  Louis Sullivan American architect 1856 - 1924

Zdroj: Kindergarten Chats (1918), Ch. 4 : The Garden
Kontext: Is it not Canon Hole who says: "He who would have beautiful roses in his garden, must have beautiful roses in his heart: he must love them well and always"? So, the flowers of your field, in so far as I am gardener, shall come from my heart where they reside in much good will; and my eye and hand shall attend merely to the cultivating, the weeding, the fungous blight, the noxious insect of the air, and the harmful worm below.
And so shall your garden grow; from the rich soil of the humanities it will rise up and unfold in beauty in the pure air of the spirit.
So shall your thoughts take up the sap of strong and generous impulse, and grow and branch, and run and climb and spread, blooming and fruiting, each after its kind, each flowing toward the fulfillment of its normal and complete desire. Some will so grow as to hug the earth in modest beauty; others will rise, through sunshine and storm, through drought and winter's snows year after year, to tower in the sky; and the birds of the air will nest therein and bring forth their young.
Such is the garden of the heart: so oft neglected and despised when fallow.
Verily, there needs a gardener, and many gardens.

William Morris foto

„To give people pleasure in the things they must perforce use, that is one great office of decoration; to give people pleasure in the things they must perforce make, that is the other use of it.“

—  William Morris author, designer, and craftsman 1834 - 1896

The Decorative Arts (1877)
Kontext: To give people pleasure in the things they must perforce use, that is one great office of decoration; to give people pleasure in the things they must perforce make, that is the other use of it.
Does not our subject look important enough now? I say that without these arts, our rest would be vacant and uninteresting, our labour mere endurance, mere wearing away of body and mind.

Joseph Addison foto

„To a man of pleasure every moment appears to be lost, which partakes not of the vivacity of amusement.“

—  Joseph Addison politician, writer and playwright 1672 - 1719

Very often attributed to Addison, this is apparently a paraphrase of a statement by Hugh Blair, published in Blair's Sermons (1815), Vol. 1, p. 219, where he mentions "men of pleasure and the men of business", and that "To the former every moment appears to be lost, which partakes not of the vivacity of amusement".
Misattributed

Brian W. Aldiss foto
John Belushi foto

„I give so much pleasure to so many people. Why can I not get some pleasure for myself?“

—  John Belushi American comedian, actor, and musician 1949 - 1982

Quoted in: Robert Andrews (2003), The New Penguin Dictionary of Modern Quotations. p. 144

Jack Vance foto
Epicurus foto

„No pleasure is in itself evil, but the things which produce certain pleasures entail annoyances many times greater than the pleasures themselves.“

—  Epicurus ancient Greek philosopher -341 - -269 př. n. l.

8
Variant translation: No pleasure is itself a bad thing, but the things that produce some kinds of pleasure, bring along with them unpleasantness that is much greater than the pleasure itself.
Sovereign Maxims

Carlos Ruiz Zafón foto
Gerald Durrell foto

„We have inherited an incredibly beautiful and complex garden, but the trouble is that we have been appallingly bad gardeners.“

—  Gerald Durrell naturalist, zookeeper, conservationist, author and television presenter 1925 - 1995

Two in the Bush (1966)
Kontext: We have inherited an incredibly beautiful and complex garden, but the trouble is that we have been appallingly bad gardeners. We have not bothered to acquaint ourselves with the simplest principles of gardening. By neglecting our garden, we are storing up for ourselves, in the not very distant future, a world catastrophe as bad as any atomic war, and we are doing it with all the bland complacency of an idiot child chopping up a Rembrandt with a pair of scissors. We go on, year after year, all over the world, creating dust bowls and erosion, cutting down forests and overgrazing our grasslands, polluting one of our most vital commodities — water — with industrial filth and all the time we are breeding with the ferocity of the Brown Rat, and wondering why there is not enough food to go round. We now stand so aloof from nature that we think we are God. This has always been a dangerous supposition.

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