„To every object there corresponds an ideally closed system of truths that are true of it and, on the other hand, an ideal system of possible cognitive processes by virtue of which the object and the truths about it would be given to any cognitive subject.“

—  Edmund Husserl, Pure Phenomenology, 1917
Edmund Husserl foto
Edmund Husserl5
německý filozof, známý jako otec fenomenologie 1859 - 1938

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Albert Einstein foto

„He may also believe in the existence of the ideal limit of knowledge and that it is approached by the human mind. He may call this ideal limit the objective truth.“

—  Albert Einstein, kniha The Evolution of Physics
1930s, Context: Physical concepts are free creations of the human mind, and are not, however it may seem, uniquely determined by the external world. In our endeavor to understand reality we are somewhat like a man trying to understand the mechanism of a closed watch. He sees the face and the moving hands, even hears its ticking, but he has no way of opening the case. If he is ingenious he may form some picture of a mechanism which could be responsible for all the things he observes, but he may never be quite sure his picture is the only one which could explain his observations. He will never be able to compare his picture with the real mechanism and he cannot even imagine the possibility or the meaning of such a comparison. But he certainly believes that, as his knowledge increases, his picture of reality will become simpler and simpler and will explain a wider and wider range of his sensuous impressions. He may also believe in the existence of the ideal limit of knowledge and that it is approached by the human mind. He may call this ideal limit the objective truth. The Evolution of Physics (1938) (co-written with Leopold Infeld) <!-- later published by Simon & Schuster (1967) -->

Paul Carus foto

„The truth is that other systems of geometry are possible, yet after all, these other systems are not spaces but other methods of space measurements. There is one space only, though we may conceive of many different manifolds, which are contrivances or ideal constructions invented for the purpose of determining space.“

—  Paul Carus American philosopher 1852 - 1919
Science, Vol. 18 (1903), p. 106, as reported in Memorabilia Mathematica; or, The Philomath's Quotation-Book https://archive.org/stream/memorabiliamathe00moriiala#page/81/mode/2up, (1914), by Robert Edouard Moritz, p. 352

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel foto

„The objects of philosophy, it is true, are upon the whole the same as those of religion. In both the object is Truth, in that supreme sense in which God and God only is the Truth.“

—  Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel German philosopher 1770 - 1831
Philosophie ... hat zwar ihre Gegenstände zunächst mit der Religion gemeinschaftlich. Beide haben die Wahrheit zu ihrem Gegenstande, und zwar im höchsten Sinne - in dem, daß Gott die Wahrheit und er allein die Wahrheit ist. Logic, Chapter 1

Joseph Lewis foto
Noam Chomsky foto

„The sign of a truly totalitarian culture is that important truths simply lack cognitive meaning“

—  Noam Chomsky american linguist, philosopher and activist 1928
Quotes 1990s, 1990-1994, Context: The sign of a truly totalitarian culture is that important truths simply lack cognitive meaning and are interpretable only at the level of "Fuck You", so they can then elicit a perfectly predictable torrent of abuse in response. We've long ago reached that level. letter to Alexander Cockburn (1 March 1990), later paraphrased in Deterring Democracy (1992) p. 345.

Gerard Manley Hopkins foto

„The best ideal is the true
And other truth is none.
All glory be ascribed to
The holy Three in One.“

—  Gerard Manley Hopkins English poet 1844 - 1889
Wessex Poems and Other Verses (1918), " Summa http://www.bartleby.com/122/52.html", lines 1-4

„Justice is the first virtue of social institutions, as truth is of systems of thought.“

—  John Rawls, kniha A Theory of Justice
A Theory of Justice (1971; 1975; 1999), Context: Justice is the first virtue of social institutions, as truth is of systems of thought. A theory however elegant and economical must be rejected or revised if it is untrue; likewise laws and institutions no matter how efficient and well-arranged must be reformed or abolished if they are unjust. Each person possesses an inviolability founded on justice that even the welfare of society as a whole cannot override. For this reason justice denies that the loss of freedom for some is made right by a greater good shared by others. It does not allow that the sacrifices imposed on a few are outweighed by the larger sum of advantages enjoyed by many. Therefore in a just society the liberties of equal citizenship are taken as settled; the rights secured by justice are not subject to political bargaining or to the calculus of social interests. Chapter I, Section 1, pg. 3-4

Jean Piaget foto

„The intentionality peculiar to motor activity is not a search for truth but the pursuit of a result, whether objective or subjective; and to succeed is not to discover a truth.“

—  Jean Piaget Swiss psychologist, biologist, logician, philosopher & academic 1896 - 1980
The Moral Judgment of the Child (1932), Context: Generally speaking, one can say that motor intelligence contains the germs of completed reason. But it gives promise of more than reason pure and simple. From the moral as from the intellectual point of view, the child is born neither good nor bad, but master of his destiny. Now, if there is intelligence in the schemas of motor adaptation, there is also the element of play. The intentionality peculiar to motor activity is not a search for truth but the pursuit of a result, whether objective or subjective; and to succeed is not to discover a truth. Ch. 2 : Adult Constraint and Moral Realism <!-- p. 93 -->

Noah Porter foto
Karel Čapek foto

„I think it is possible, and that is the most dramatic element in modern civilization, that a human truth is opposed to another human truth no less human, ideal against ideal, positive worth against worth no less positive, instead of the struggle being as we are so often told, one between noble truth and vile selfish error.“

—  Karel Čapek Czech writer 1890 - 1938
Context: Be these people either Conservatives or Socialists, Yellows or Reds, the most important thing is — and that is the point I want to stress — that all of them are right in the plain and moral sense of the word... I ask whether it is not possible to see in the present social conflict of the world an analogous struggle between two, three, five equally serious verities and equally generous idealisms? I think it is possible, and that is the most dramatic element in modern civilization, that a human truth is opposed to another human truth no less human, ideal against ideal, positive worth against worth no less positive, instead of the struggle being as we are so often told, one between noble truth and vile selfish error. R.U.R. supplement in The Saturday Review (1923)

Albert Schweitzer foto

„It is the fate of every truth to be an object of ridicule when it is first acclaimed.“

—  Albert Schweitzer French-German physician, theologian, musician and philosopher 1875 - 1965
Kulturphilosophie (1923), Vol. 2 : Civilization and Ethics, Context: It is the fate of every truth to be an object of ridicule when it is first acclaimed. It was once considered foolish to suppose that black men were really human beings and ought to be treated as such. What was once foolish has now become a recognized truth. Today it is considered as exaggeration to proclaim constant respect for every form of life as being the serious demand of a rational ethic. But the time is coming when people will be amazed that the human race existed so long before it recognized that thoughtless injury to life is incompatible with real ethics. Ethics is in its unqualified form extended responsibility to everything that has life.

George Holmes Howison foto
G. I. Gurdjieff foto

„Objective knowledge, the idea of unity included, belongs to objective consciousness. The forms which express this knowledge when perceived by subjective consciousness are inevitably distorted and, instead of truth, they create more and more delusions.“

—  G. I. Gurdjieff influential spiritual teacher, Armenian philosopher, composer and writer 1866 - 1949
In Search of the Miraculous (1949), Context: Objective knowledge, the idea of unity included, belongs to objective consciousness. The forms which express this knowledge when perceived by subjective consciousness are inevitably distorted and, instead of truth, they create more and more delusions. With objective consciousness it is possible to see and feel the unity of everything. But for subjective consciousness the world is split up into millions of separate and unconnected phenomena. Attempts to connect these phenomena into some sort of system in a scientific or philosophical way lead to nothing because man cannot reconstruct the idea of the whole starting from separate facts and they cannot divine the principles of the division of the whole without knowing the laws upon which this division is based.

George Sand foto

„Art is not a study of positive reality, it is the seeking for ideal truth.“

—  George Sand, kniha La Mare au diable
L'art n'est pas une étude de la réalité positive; c'est une recherche de la vérité idéale. La Mare au Diable, ch. 1 (1851); Frank Hunter Potter (trans.) The Haunted Pool (New York: Dodd, Mead, 1895) p. 15

F. H. Bradley foto
John Ruskin foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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