„What can he mean by coming among us? He is not only dull himself, but the cause of dullness in others.“

—  James Boswell, kniha The Life of Samuel Johnson, The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (1791), Spoken by Samuel Foote about a "law-Lord" (1783)
James Boswell foto
James Boswell2
skotský právník, diarista a autor 1740 - 1795

Podobné citáty

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„He is not only dull himself, but the cause of dullness in others.“

—  Samuel Johnson English writer 1709 - 1784
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919), 1784

Percy Bysshe Shelley foto
John Oldham (poet) foto

„While some no other cause for life can give
But a dull habitude to live.“

—  John Oldham (poet) English satirical poet and translator 1653 - 1683
To the Memory of Norwent, Paragraph 5; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922).

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„Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast.“

—  Oscar Wilde, An Ideal Husband
An Ideal Husband (1895), Mrs Chevely, Act I

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„Whatever else he was during his life, he was never dull, and the world forgives almost anything but stupidity.“

—  Clarence Darrow American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union 1857 - 1938
Voltaire (1916)

Jiddu Krishnamurti foto

„Psychological knowledge has made us dull.“

—  Jiddu Krishnamurti Indian spiritual philosopher 1895 - 1986
1980s, 4th Public Talk, Ojai, California (10 April 1980)

Cassandra Clare foto
George Sand foto

„Which of us has not some sorrow to dull, or some yoke to cast off?“

—  George Sand French novelist and memoirist; pseudonym of Lucile Aurore Dupin 1804 - 1876
Context: All of us who have time and money to spare, travel — that is to say, we flee; since surely it is not so much a question of travelling as of getting away? Which of us has not some sorrow to dull, or some yoke to cast off? Un Hiver à Majorque, pt. 1, ch. 4 (1855); Robert Graves (trans.) Winter in Majorca (Chicago: Academy Press, 1978) p. 29

G. K. Chesterton foto

„For fear of the newspapers politicians are dull, and at last they are too dull even for the newspapers.“

—  G. K. Chesterton, kniha All Things Considered
All Things Considered (1908), Context: For fear of the newspapers politicians are dull, and at last they are too dull even for the newspapers. The speeches in our time are more careful and elaborate, because they are meant to be read, and not to be heard. And exactly because they are more careful and elaborate, they are not so likely to be worthy of a careful and elaborate report. They are not interesting enough. So the moral cowardice of modern politicians has, after all, some punishment attached to it by the silent anger of heaven. Precisely because our political speeches are meant to be reported, they are not worth reporting. Precisely because they are carefully designed to be read, nobody reads them. "On the Cryptic and the Elliptic"

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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