„Seeming wise men may make shift to get opinion; but let no man choose them for employment; for certainly you were better take for business, a man somewhat absurd, than over-formal.“

—  Francis Bacon, kniha Essays

Of Seeming Wise
Essays (1625)

Poslední aktualizace 22. května 2020. Historie
Francis Bacon foto
Francis Bacon92
anglický filozof, státník, vědec, právník a autor 1561 - 1626

Podobné citáty

Marcus Aurelius foto
Thomas Fuller (writer) foto
Leonard Trelawny Hobhouse foto
H.L. Mencken foto

„Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free than Christianity has made them good.“

—  H.L. Mencken American journalist and writer 1880 - 1956

394
1940s–present
Kontext: The highfalutin aims of democracy, whether real or imaginary, are always assumed to be identical with its achievements. This, of course, is sheer hallucination. Not one of those aims, not even the aim of giving every adult a vote, has been realized. It has no more made men wise and free than Christianity has made them good.

Francois Rabelais foto

„Translation: In all companies there are more fools than wise men, and the greater part always gets the better of the wiser.“

—  Francois Rabelais, kniha Gargantua and Pantagruel

En toutes compagnies il y a plus de folz que de sages, et la plus grande partie surmonte tousjours la meilleure.
Chapter 10 http://books.google.com/books?id=wfRKAQAAIAAJ&q=%22En+toutes+compagnies+il+y+a+plus+de+folz+que+de+sages+et+la+plus+grande+partie+surmonte+tousjours+la+meilleure%22&pg=PA285#v=onepage.
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Pantagruel (1532)

Harold Geneen foto

„It is better to take over and build upon an existing business than to start a new one.“

—  Harold Geneen American businessman 1910 - 1997

Managing, Chapter Ten (Acquisitions and Growth), p. 158.

Elijah Muhammad foto
Charles Brockden Brown foto
Stanley Baldwin foto
Eugene V. Debs foto

„We were taught under the old ethic that man's business on this earth was to look out for himself. That was the ethic of the jungle; the ethic of the wild beast. Take care of yourself, no matter what may become of your fellow man.“

—  Eugene V. Debs American labor and political leader 1855 - 1926

The Issue (1908)
Kontext: Now my friends, I am opposed to the system of society in which we live today, not because I lack the natural equipment to do for myself, but because I am not satisfied to make myself comfortable knowing that there are thousands of my fellow men who suffer for the barest necessities of life. We were taught under the old ethic that man's business on this earth was to look out for himself. That was the ethic of the jungle; the ethic of the wild beast. Take care of yourself, no matter what may become of your fellow man. Thousands of years ago the question was asked: "Am I my brother's keeper?" That question has never yet been answered in a way that is satisfactory to civilized society.
Yes, I am my brother's keeper. I am under a moral obligation to him that is inspired, not by any maudlin sentimentality, but by the higher duty I owe to myself. What would you think of me if I were capable of seating myself at a table and gorging myself with food and saw about me the children of my fellow beings starving to death?

George Savile, 1st Marquess of Halifax foto
Arthur Helps foto
Aurangzeb foto

„No age is wanting in able men; it is the duty of wise masters to find them out, win them over, and get work done by means of them, without listening to the calumnies of selfish men against them.“

—  Aurangzeb Sixth Mughal Emperor 1618 - 1707

Ruqat-i-Alamgiri, as quoted in Later Mughals : Volume II : 1719-1739 (1922) by Irvine William Irvine http://www.archive.org/details/latermughals02irviuoft
Quotes from late medieval histories

Samuel Adams foto

„We cannot make Events. Our Business is wisely to improve them.“

—  Samuel Adams American statesman, Massachusetts governor, and political philosopher 1722 - 1803

Letter to Samuel Cooper (30 April 1776) http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/2093
Kontext: We cannot make Events. Our Business is wisely to improve them. There has been much to do to confirm doubting Friends & fortify the Timid. It requires time to bring honest Men to think & determine alike even in important Matters. Mankind are governed more by their feelings than by reason.

Harriet Beecher Stowe foto
Arthur Miller foto
Miguel de Cervantes foto

„Let every man mind his own business.“

—  Miguel de Cervantes Spanish novelist, poet, and playwright 1547 - 1616

Zdroj: Don Quixote de la Mancha (1605–1615), Part I, Book III, Ch. 8.

Herman Melville foto

„And, frankly, for the sake of the argument, let us call him a fool; — then had I rather be a fool than a wise man. —I love all men who dive.“

—  Herman Melville American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet 1818 - 1891

Letter to Evert Augustus Duyckinck (3 March 1849); published in The Letters of Herman Melville (1960) edited by Merrell R. Davis and William H. Gilman, p. 78; a portion of this is sometimes modernized in two ways:
Kontext: I do not oscillate in Emerson's rainbow, but prefer rather to hang myself in mine own halter than swing in any other man's swing. Yet I think Emerson is more than a brilliant fellow. Be his stuff begged, borrowed, or stolen, or of his own domestic manufacture he is an uncommon man. Swear he is a humbug — then is he no common humbug. Lay it down that had not Sir Thomas Browne lived, Emerson would not have mystified — I will answer, that had not Old Zack's father begot him, old Zack would never have been the hero of Palo Alto. The truth is that we are all sons, grandsons, or nephews or great-nephews of those who go before us. No one is his own sire. — I was very agreeably disappointed in Mr Emerson. I had heard of him as full of transcendentalisms, myths & oracular gibberish; I had only glanced at a book of his once in Putnam's store — that was all I knew of him, till I heard him lecture. — To my surprise, I found him quite intelligible, tho' to say truth, they told me that that night he was unusually plain. — Now, there is a something about every man elevated above mediocrity, which is, for the most part, instinctuly perceptible. This I see in Mr Emerson. And, frankly, for the sake of the argument, let us call him a fool; — then had I rather be a fool than a wise man. —I love all men who dive. Any fish can swim near the surface, but it takes a great whale to go down stairs five miles or more; & if he don't attain the bottom, why, all the lead in Galena can't fashion the plumet that will. I'm not talking of Mr Emerson now — but of the whole corps of thought-divers, that have been diving & coming up again with bloodshot eyes since the world began.
I could readily see in Emerson, notwithstanding his merit, a gaping flaw. It was, the insinuation, that had he lived in those days when the world was made, he might have offered some valuable suggestions. These men are all cracked right across the brow. And never will the pullers-down be able to cope with the builders-up. And this pulling down is easy enough — a keg of powder blew up Block's Monument — but the man who applied the match, could not, alone, build such a pile to save his soul from the shark-maw of the Devil. But enough of this Plato who talks thro' his nose.

William Booth foto

„Let the business of the world take care of itself … My business is to get the world saved“

—  William Booth British Methodist preacher 1829 - 1912

"The Risks" in The War Cry (20 December 1884)
Kontext: Let the business of the world take care of itself … My business is to get the world saved; if this involves the standing still of the looms and the shutting up of the factories, and the staying of the sailing of the ships, let them all stand still. When we have got everybody converted they can go on again, and we shall be able to keep things going then by working half time and have the rest to spend in loving one another and worshipping God.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“