„My first pictures were done by instinct, the others with more method perhaps. Instinct which nourishes method can often be superior to a method which nourishes instinct.“

—  Pierre Bonnard, quoted by his brother-in-law Claude Terrasse, in 'Introduction' of Pierre Bonnard, John Rewald; MoMA - distribution Simon & Schuster, New York, 1918
Pierre Bonnard foto
Pierre Bonnard10
francouzský malíř a grafik 1867 - 1947

Podobné citáty

Georges Duhamel foto
Gerhard Richter foto
Maurice de Vlaminck foto

„.. translated by instinct, without any method, not merely an artistic truth but above all a human one.“

—  Maurice de Vlaminck French painter 1876 - 1958
Quotes undated, Quote of De Vlaminck; as cited in Les Fauves, The Museum of Modern Art; Simon & Schuster, New York, 1952; quoted in 'Becoming an Artist' on Widewalls https://www.widewalls.ch/artist/maurice-de-vlaminck/

Edward Sapir foto

„Language is a purely human and non-instinctive method of communicating ideas, emotions and desires by means of a system of voluntarily produced symbols.“

—  Edward Sapir American linguist and anthropologist 1884 - 1939
Language (1921), As cited in: Geza Revesz, The Origins and Prehistory of Language, London 1956. footnote pp. 126-127; As cited in: Adam Schaff (1962). Introduction to semantics, p. 313-314

Tryon Edwards foto
Niccolo Machiavelli foto

„You must know, then, that there are two methods of fighting, the one by law, the other by force: the first method is that of men, the second of beasts; but as the first method is often insufficient, one must have recourse to the second.“

—  Niccolo Machiavelli, kniha Vladař
The Prince (1513), Context: How laudable it is for a prince to keep good faith and live with integrity, and not with astuteness, every one knows. Still the experience of our times shows those princes to have done great things who have had little regard for good faith, and have been able by astuteness to confuse men's brains, and who have ultimately overcome those who have made loyalty their foundation. You must know, then, that there are two methods of fighting, the one by law, the other by force: the first method is that of men, the second of beasts; but as the first method is often insufficient, one must have recourse to the second. It is therefore necessary to know well how to use both the beast and the man. This was covertly taught to princes by ancient writers, who relate how Achilles and many others of those princes were given to Chiron the centaur to be brought up, who kept them under his discipline; this system of having for teacher one who was half beast and half man is meant to indicate that a prince must know how to use both natures, and that the one without the other is not durable. A prince being thus obliged to know well how to act as a beast must imitate the fox and the lion, for the lion cannot protect himself from snares, and the fox cannot defend himself from wolves. One must therefore be a fox to recognise snares, and a lion to frighten wolves. Those that wish to be only lions do not understand this. Therefore, a prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him bind himself no longer exist. If men were all good, this precept would not be a good one; but as they are bad, and would not observe their faith with you, so you are not bound to keep faith with them.... those that have been best able to imitate the fox have succeeded best. But it is necessary to be able to disguise this character well, and to be a great feigner and dissembler. Ch. 18 Variant translations of portions of this passage: Every one admits how praiseworthy it is in a prince to keep faith, and to live with integrity and not with craft. Nevertheless our experience has been that those princes who have done great things have held good faith of little account, and have known how to circumvent the intellect of men by craft, and in the end have overcome those who have relied on their word. Ch. 18. Concerning the Way in which Princes should keep Faith (as translated by W. K. Marriott) A prince being thus obliged to know well how to act as a beast must imitate the fox and the lion, for the lion cannot protect himself from traps, and the fox cannot defend himself from wolves. One must therefore be a fox to recognize traps, and a lion to frighten wolves. You must know there are two ways of contesting, the one by the law, the other by force; the first method is proper to men, the second to beasts; but because the first is frequently not sufficient, it is necessary to have recourse to the second.

Friedrich Hayek foto
Edmund Burke foto

„He had no failings which were not owing to a noble cause; to an ardent, generous, perhaps an immoderate passion for fame; a passion which is the instinct of all great souls.“

—  Edmund Burke Anglo-Irish statesman 1729 - 1797
First Speech on the Conciliation with America (1774), The reference is to Charles Townshend (1725–1767)

Graham Greene foto

„That instinct for human character that is perhaps inherent in an imaginative writer.“

—  Graham Greene English writer, playwright and literary critic 1904 - 1991
Getting to know the General (1984)

J. Howard Moore foto
Anaïs Nin foto
Gwynfor Evans foto
Johann Gottlieb Fichte foto
Benjamin Disraeli foto
Arthur Schopenhauer foto

„The method of viewing things which proceeds in accordance with the principle of sufficient reason is the rational method, and it alone is valid and of use in practical life and in science. The method which looks away from the content of this principle is the method of genius, which is only valid and of use in art.“

—  Arthur Schopenhauer, kniha The World as Will and Representation
The World as Will and Representation (1819; 1844; 1859), Die dem Satz vom Grunde nachgehende ist die vernünftige Betrachtungsart, welche im praktischen Leben, wie in der Wissenschaft, allein gilt und hilft: die vom Inhalt jenes Satzes wegsehende ist die geniale Betrachtungsart, welche in der Kunst allein gilt und hilft. Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung, Zweiter Band, Ergänzungen zum dritten Buch, para. 36 (1859)

Jawaharlal Nehru foto

„I knew that Gandhiji usually acts on instinct (I prefer to call it that than the "inner voice" or an answer to prayer) and very often that instinct is right.“

—  Jawaharlal Nehru Indian lawyer, statesman, and writer, first Prime Minister of India 1889 - 1964
Autobiography (1936; 1949; 1958), Context: I knew that Gandhiji usually acts on instinct (I prefer to call it that than the "inner voice" or an answer to prayer) and very often that instinct is right. He has repeatedly shown what a wonderful knack he has of sensing the mass mind and of acting at the psychological moment. The reasons which he afterward adduces to justify his action are usually afterthoughts and seldom carry one very far. A leader or a man of action in a crisis almost always acts subconsciously and then thinks of the reasons for his action. On Mahatma Gandhi<!-- p. 506 (1949) / p. 310 (1961) -->

Theda Bara foto

„The reason good women like me and flock to my pictures is that there is a little bit of vampire instinct in every woman.“

—  Theda Bara Silent film actress 1885 - 1955
Reportedly said around the time of her retirement, circa 1926, as quoted in Women, Women, Women: Quips, Quotes, and Commentary (1977) by Leta W. Clark, p. 16

„The criterion by which Jesus judges every method is this; Can it be used appropriately in the home?“

—  Kirby Page American clergyman 1890 - 1957
Jesus or Christianity: A Study in Contrasts (1929), Context: Can the use of physical force ever be reconciled with the family spirit?... On one occasion he appears to have resorted to force himself... It sheds no light upon the question as to whether the taking of life, capital punishment, or war are ever justifiable. The criterion by which Jesus judges every method is this; Can it be used appropriately in the home? p. 21

Alexander Bain foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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