„The author of The Prophet not only has the good luck to have talent, he has also the talent to have good luck.“

—  Hector Berlioz, Les soirées de l'orchestre (1852), ch. 5 http://www.hberlioz.com/Writings/SO05.htm;Jacques Barzun (trans.) Evenings with the Orchestra (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999) p. 62.
Původní znění

L'auteur de ce Prophète a non seulement le bonheur d'avoir du talent, mais aussi le talent d'avoir du bonheur.

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Hector Berlioz9
nejvýznamnější francouzský skladatel, dirigent, hudební k... 1803 - 1869
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