„The good historian is not for any time or any country: while he loves his fatherland, he never flatters it in anything.“

Le bon historien n'est d'aucun temps ni d'aucun pays: quoiqu'il aime sa patrie, il ne la flatte jamais en rien.
Lettre sur les Occupations de l'Académie Française, sect. 8, cited from Œuvres de Fénelon (Paris: Lefèvre, 1835) vol. 3, p. 240; translation by Patrick Riley, from Hans Blom et al. (eds.) Monarchisms in the Age of Enlightenment (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007) p. 86.

Originál

Le bon historien n'est d'aucun temps ni d'aucun pays; quoiqu'il aime sa patrie, il ne la flatte jamais en rien.

Varianta: Le bon historien n'est d'aucun temps ni d'aucun pays: quoiqu'il aime sa patrie, il ne la flatte jamais en rien.

Převzato z Wikiquote. Poslední aktualizace 3. června 2021. Historie
Francois Fénelon foto
Francois Fénelon12
katolický biskup 1651 - 1715

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