„Before him all Rome trembled.“

Act II
Tosca (1900)

Originál

Avanti a lui tremava tutta Roma. (Floria Tosca)

Tosca (1900)

Poslední aktualizace 22. května 2020. Historie
Giacomo Puccini foto
Giacomo Puccini1
italský operní skladatel 1858 - 1924

Podobné citáty

Statius foto

„That day was the day of Tydeus: from him they flee and tremble.“

—  Statius, kniha Thebaid

Originál: (la) Tydeos illa dies, illum fugiuntque tremuntque.
Zdroj: Thebaid, Book VIII, Line 663 (tr. J. H. Mozley)

William Lloyd Garrison foto
Taliesin foto
Auguste Rodin foto

„The main thing is to be moved, to love, to hope, to tremble, to live. Be a man before being an artist.“

—  Auguste Rodin French sculptor 1840 - 1917

Attributed to Rodin in H. Read (1964), as cited in: Karl H. Pfenninger, ‎Valerie R. Shubik, ‎Bruce Adolphe (2001). The Origins of Creativity. p. 50
1950s-1990s

Holly Black foto
Rick Riordan foto
Pierre Corneille foto

„Rome alone can resist Rome.“

—  Pierre Corneille, Sertorius

Rome seule aujourd'hui peut résister à Rome.
Viriate, act II, scene i.
Sertorius (1662)

Pierre Corneille foto

„Rome is no longer in Rome, it is here where I am.“

—  Pierre Corneille, Sertorius

Rome n'est plus dans Rome, elle est toute où je suis.
Sertorius, act III, scene i.
Sertorius (1662)

Miguel de Cervantes foto

„When thou art at Rome, do as they do at Rome.“

—  Miguel de Cervantes Spanish novelist, poet, and playwright 1547 - 1616

Zdroj: Don Quixote de la Mancha (1605–1615), Part II (1615), Book III, Ch. 54.

Theodor Mommsen foto

„In internal affairs they were, if possible, still more disposed to let the ship drive before the wind: if we understand by internal government more than the transaction of current business, there was at this period no government in Rome at all.“

—  Theodor Mommsen German classical scholar, historian, jurist, journalist, politician, archaeologist and writer 1817 - 1903

Vol 3, Pg 71-73, Translated by W.P. Dickson
On the Roman government before the Ghracci brothers and the spread of decay within it.
The History of Rome - Volume 3
Kontext: For a whole generation after the battle of Pydna the Roman state enjoyed a profound calm, scarcely varied by a ripple here and there on the surface. Its dominion extended over three continents; the lustre of the Roman power and the glory of the Roman name were constantly on the increase; all eyes rested on Italy, all talents and all riches flowed thither; it seemed as if a golden age of peaceful prosperity and intellectual enjoyment of life had there begun. The Orientals of this period told each other with astonishment of the might republic of the West,'which subdued kingdoms far and near, so that everyone who heard its name trembled; but which kept good faith with its friends and clients. Such was the glory of the Romans, and yet no one usurped the crown and no one glittered in purple dress; but they obeyed whomsoever from year to year they made their master, and there was among them neither envy nor discord.'So it seemed at a distance; matters wore a different aspect on a closer view. The government of the aristocracy was in full train to destroy its own work. Not that the sons and grandsons of the vanquished at Cannae and Zama had so utterly degenerated from their fathers and grandfathers; the difference was not so much in the men who now sat in the Senate as in the times. Where a limited number of old families of established wealth and hereditary political importance conducts the government, it will display in seasons of danger an incomparable tenacity of purpose and power of heroic self-sacrifice, just as in seasons of tranquility it will be short-sighted, selfish, and negligent; the germs of both results are essentially involved in its hereditary and collegiate character. The morbid matter had been long in existence, but it needed the sun of prosperity to develop it. There was a profound meaning in the question of Cato, "What was to become of Rome, when she should no longer have any state to fear?" that point had now been reached. Every neighbor whom she might have feared was politically annihilated; and of the men, who had been reared under the older order of things in the severe school of the Hannibalic War, and whose words still sounded as echoes of that mighty epoch so long as they survived, death called on after another away, till at length the voice of the last of them, the Veteran Cato, ceased to be heard in the Senate-house and in the Forum. A younger generation came to the helm, and their policy was a sorry answer to that of the question of the veteran patriot. We have already spoken the shape which the government of the subjects and external policy of rome assumed in their hands. In internal affairs they were, if possible, still more disposed to let the ship drive before the wind: if we understand by internal government more than the transaction of current business, there was at this period no government in Rome at all. The single leading thought of the governing corporation was the maintenance and, if possible, the increase of their usurped privileges. It was not the state that had a title to get the right and the best man for its supreme magistracy; but every member of the coterie had an inborn title to the highest office of the state - a title not to be prejudiced by the unfair rivalry of his peers or by the encroachments of the excluded. Accordingly the clique proposed to itself as its most important political aim, the restriction of reelection to the consulship and the exclusion of "new men;" and in fact succeeded in obtaining the legal prohibition of the former about (165) and contented itself with a government of aristocratic nobodies. Even the inaction of the government in its outward relations was doubtless connected with this policy of the nobility, exclusive towards commoners, and distrustful towards the individual members of their own order. By no surer means could they keep commoners, whose deeds were their patent of nobility, aloof from the pure circles of the aristocracy than by giving no opportunity to any one to perform deeds at all...

Samuel Butler (poet) foto

„Nor do I know what is become
Of him, more than the Pope of Rome.“

—  Samuel Butler (poet) poet and satirist 1612 - 1680

Canto III, line 263
Zdroj: Hudibras, Part I (1663–1664)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe foto

„Though you're a whole world, Rome, still, without Love,
The world isn't the world, and Rome can't be Rome.“

—  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, kniha Roman Elegies

Elegy 1
Roman Elegies (1789)
Kontext: I'm gazing at church and palace, ruin and column,
Like a serious man making sensible use of a journey,
But soon it will happen, and all will be one vast temple,
Love's temple, receiving its new initiate.
Though you're a whole world, Rome, still, without Love,
The world isn't the world, and Rome can't be Rome.

„All that grave weight of America
Cancelled! Like Greece and Rome.
The future in ruins!“

—  Louis Simpson Jamaican poet 1923 - 2012

Walt Whitman at Bear Mountain (l. 35-37) (1962)
Poetry quotes

Francesco Dall'Ongaro foto

„Translation: All roads alike may lead us unto Rome.“

—  Francesco Dall'Ongaro Italian poet, playwright and librettist 1808 - 1873

Tutte le vie ponno condurre a Roma.
Stornelli Politici, "Giammai".
Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 242.

Joseph Conrad foto
Wesley Clark foto

„I think we're at a time in American history that's probably analogous to, maybe, Rome before the first emperors, when the Republic started to fall…“

—  Wesley Clark American general and former Democratic Party presidential candidate 1944

Interview with Laura Knoy, New Hampshire Public Radio (5 November 2003)
Kontext: I think we're at a time in American history that's probably analogous to, maybe, Rome before the first emperors, when the Republic started to fall... I think if you look at the pattern of events, if you look at the disputed election of 2000, can you imagine? In America, people are trying to recount ballots and a partisan mob is pounding on the glass and threatening the counters? Can you imagine that? Can you imagine a political party which does its best to keep any representatives from another party — who've even been affiliated with another party — from getting a business job in the nation's capital? Can you imagine a political party that wants to redistrict so that its opponents can be driven out entirely?... it's a different time in America and the Republic is — this election is about a lot more than jobs. I'm not sure everybody in America sees it right now. But I see it, I feel it.

Christopher Pitt foto
Rick Riordan foto

Související témata