„The pleasures of the mighty are obtained by the tears of the poor.“

—  Samuel Richardson, kniha Clarissa, Clarissa (1747–1748), Vol. 1, p. 286; Letter 43.
Samuel Richardson foto
Samuel Richardson5
1689 - 1761

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„Pleasure, a most mighty lure to evil.“

—  Platón, kniha Timaeus
Timaeus, ἡδονήν, μέγιστον κακοῡ δέλεαρ Section 69d (W. R. M. Lamb's translation); also rendered: pleasure, "the bait of sin" (W.A. Falconer's translation).

Statius foto

„The loss of one lion alone drew a tear from mighty Caesar's eye.“

—  Statius, Silvae
Silvae, Book II, Magni quod Caesaris ora... unius amissi tetigit jactura leonis. v, line 27 (tr. J. H. Mozley)

Emily Brontë foto

„In secret pleasure — secret tears
This changeful life has slipped away“

—  Emily Brontë, kniha Na Větrné hůrce
I Am the Only Being (1836), Context: I am the only being whose doom No tongue would ask no eye would mourn I never caused a thought of gloom A smile of joy since I was born In secret pleasure — secret tears This changeful life has slipped away As friendless after eighteen years As lone as on my natal day

Madonna foto

„Poor is the man whose pleasures depend on the permission of another.“

—  Madonna American singer, songwriter, and actress 1958
(Lyrics from Justify My Love).

John Keats foto

„Music's golden tongue
Flatter'd to tears this aged man and poor.“

—  John Keats, The Eve of St. Agnes
Poems (1820), The Eve of St. Agnes, Stanza 3

Muhammad foto
Mignon McLaughlin foto

„The poor have the same basic pleasures as the rich, and the rich will always resent it.“

—  Mignon McLaughlin American journalist 1913 - 1983
The Complete Neurotic's Notebook (1981), Unclassified

Neil Peart foto
Baba Hari Dass foto

„When a person realizes peace inside by doing yoga, he will not smoke and get peace disturbed. The peace obtained by yoga is much higher than the pleasure of smoking.“

—  Baba Hari Dass master yogi, author, builder, commentator of Indian spiritual tradition 1923 - 2018
The Yellow Book, 1974, concerning smoking and yoga path, p.6

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg foto
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James Mill foto

„Of the laws of nature on which the condition of man depends, that which is attended with the greatest number of consequences is the necessity of labor for obtaining the means of subsistence, as well as the means of the greatest part of our pleasures.“

—  James Mill Scottish historian, economist, political theorist and philosopher 1773 - 1836
Government (1820), Context: Of the laws of nature on which the condition of man depends, that which is attended with the greatest number of consequences is the necessity of labor for obtaining the means of subsistence, as well as the means of the greatest part of our pleasures. This is no doubt the primary cause of government; for if nature had produced spontaneously all the objects which we desire, and in sufficient abundance for the desires of all, there would have been no source of dispute or of injury among men, nor would any man have possessed the means of ever acquiring authority over another. The results are exceedingly different when nature produces the objects of desire not in sufficient abundance for all. The source of dispute is then exhaustless, and every man has the means of acquiring authority over others in proportion to the quantity of those objects which he is able to possess. In this case the end to be obtained through government as the means, is to make that distribution of the scanty materials of happiness which would insure the greatest sum of it in the members of the community taken altogether, preventing every individual or combination of individuals from interfering with that distribution or making any man to have less than his share.

Arthur Miller foto
Joseph Addison foto

„Mysterious love, uncertain treasure,
Hast thou more of pain or pleasure!
Chill'd with tears,
Kill'd with fears,
Endless torments dwell about thee:
Yet who would live, and live without thee!“

—  Joseph Addison politician, writer and playwright 1672 - 1719
Context: Every star, and every pow'r, Look down on this important hour: Lend your protection and defence Every guard of innocence! Help me my Henry to assuage, To gain his love or bear his rage. Mysterious love, uncertain treasure, Hast thou more of pain or pleasure! Chill'd with tears, Kill'd with fears, Endless torments dwell about thee: Yet who would live, and live without thee! Queen Elinor in Rosamond (c. 1707), Act III, sc. ii.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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