„Science and ideology are closely connected to each other, in spite of those pedants who would like to separate them. In any case, since social praxis, which produces and promotes the develópment of language, is the common basis for both the relatively objective knowledge of the world, and for attitudes of evaluation, a genetic link exists.“

Zdroj: Essays in the Philosophy of Language, 1967, p. 127

Poslední aktualizace 4. června 2020. Historie
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Adam Schaff1
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