„The first thing I remember about the world — and I pray that it may be the last — is that I was a stranger in it.“

Apologia pro vita sua (1968)
Kontext: The first thing I remember about the world — and I pray that it may be the last — is that I was a stranger in it. This feeling, which everyone has in some degree, and which is, at once, the glory and desolation of homo sapiens, provides the only thread of consistency that I can detect in my life.

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Malcolm Muggeridge3
anglický novinář, autor, mediální osobnost a satirik 1903 - 1990

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„And how am I to face the odds
Of man’s bedevilment and God’s?
I, a stranger and afraid
In a world I never made.“

—  A.E. Housman English classical scholar and poet 1859 - 1936

No. 12, l. 15-18.
Last Poems http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext05/8lspm10.txt (1922)

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„I am a citizen of the world, known to all and to all a stranger.“

—  Desiderius Erasmus Dutch Renaissance humanist, Catholic priest, and theologian 1466 - 1536

As quoted in Erasmus (1970) by György Faludy, p. 197

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„a perpetual stranger
am I to the world
I don't understand its language
my silence it can't comprehend“

—  Bei Dao contemporary Chinese (PRC) avant garde poet 1949

"A perpetual stranger...", p. 110
Variant translation:
In the world I am
Always a stranger
I do not understand its language
It does not understand my silence
The August Sleepwalker (1990)

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„The notions about the benefits of transgression in my last three novels are not ones I want to see fulfilled. Rather, they are extreme possibilities that may be forced into reality by the suffocating pressures of the conformist world we inhabit.“

—  J. G. Ballard British writer 1930 - 2009

As quoted in "Age of unreason" by Jeannette Baxter in The Guardian (22 June 2004) http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2004/jun/22/sciencefictionfantasyandhorror.jgballard
Kontext: The notions about the benefits of transgression in my last three novels are not ones I want to see fulfilled. Rather, they are extreme possibilities that may be forced into reality by the suffocating pressures of the conformist world we inhabit. Boredom and a deadening sense of total pointlessness seem to drive a lot of meaningless crimes, from the Hungerford and Columbine shootings to the Dando murder, and there have been dozens of similar crimes in the US and elsewhere over the past 30 years.
These meaningless crimes are much more difficult to explain than the 9/11 attacks, and say far more about the troubled state of the western psyche. My novels offer an extreme hypothesis which future events may disprove — or confirm. They're in the nature of long-range weather forecasts.

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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