„From the saints I must take the substance, not the accidents of their virtues.“

—  Jan XXIII.

Journal of a Soul (1903)
Kontext: From the saints I must take the substance, not the accidents of their virtues. I am not St. Aloysius, nor must I seek holiness in his particular way, but according to the requirements of my own nature, my own character and the different conditions of my life. I must not be the dry, bloodless reproduction of a model, however perfect. God desires us to follow the examples of the saints by absorbing the vital sap of their virtues and turning it into our own life-blood, adapting it to our own individual capacities and particular circumstances. If St. Aloysius had been as I am, he would have become holy in a different way.

Převzato z Wikiquote. Poslední aktualizace 3. června 2021. Historie
Jan XXIII. foto
Jan XXIII.13
261. papež katolické církve 1881 - 1963

Podobné citáty

Victor Hugo foto
Ralph Waldo Emerson foto

„The virtues of society are the vices of the saints.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

Circles
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

Aleister Crowley foto

„I believe in the communion of Saints.
And, forasmuch as meat and drink are transmuted in us daily into spiritual substance, I believe in the Miracle of the Mass.“

—  Aleister Crowley poet, mountaineer, occultist 1875 - 1947

III Of the Ceremony of the Introit, "Creed of the Gnostic Catholic Church".
Liber XV : The Gnostic Mass (1913)
Kontext: I believe in the communion of Saints.
And, forasmuch as meat and drink are transmuted in us daily into spiritual substance, I believe in the Miracle of the Mass.
And I confess one Baptism of Wisdom, whereby we accomplish the Miracle of Incarnation.
And I confess my life one, individual and eternal that was, and is, and is to come.

Peter Greenaway foto
Jeet Thayil foto
Alfred North Whitehead foto

„In all philosophic theory there is an ultimate which is actual in virtue of its accidents.“

—  Alfred North Whitehead English mathematician and philosopher 1861 - 1947

Pt. I, ch. 1, sec. 2.
1920s, Process and Reality: An Essay in Cosmology (1929)
Kontext: In all philosophic theory there is an ultimate which is actual in virtue of its accidents. It is only then capable of characterization through its accidental embodiments, and apart from these accidents is devoid of actuality. In the philosophy of organism this ultimate is termed creativity; and God] is its primordial, non-temporal accident. In [[monistic philosophies, Spinoza's or absolute idealism, this ultimate is God, who is also equivalently termed The Absolute. In such monistic schemes, the ultimate is illegitimately allowed a final, eminent reality, beyond that ascribed to any of its accidents. In this general position the philosophy of organism seems to approximate more to some strains of Indian, or Chinese, thought, than to western Asiatic, or European, thought. One side makes process ultimate; the other side makes fact ultimate.

Mario Puzo foto
F. Scott Fitzgerald foto
Graham Greene foto
Desiderius Erasmus foto
Théodore Guérin foto
Miguel de Unamuno foto

„Reason perhaps teaches certain bourgeois virtues, but it does not make either heroes or saints.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno 19th-20th century Spanish writer and philosopher 1864 - 1936

The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), XI : The Practical Problem

Samuel Butler (poet) foto
George H. W. Bush foto
Georg Büchner foto
Robert Ardrey foto
Emil M. Cioran foto
Bertrand Russell foto

„The world in which we live can be understood as a result of muddle and accident; but if it is the outcome of a deliberate purpose, the purpose must have been that of a fiend. For my part, I find accident a less painful and more plausible hypothesis.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

Essay Do We Survive Death? (1936)
1930s
Kontext: It is only when we think abstractly that we have such a high opinion of man. Of men in the concrete, most of us think the vast majority very bad. Civilized states spend more than half their revenue on killing each other's citizens. Consider the long history of the activities inspired by moral fervour: human sacrifices, persecutions of heretics, witch-hunts, pogroms leading up to wholesale extermination by poison gases … Are these abominations, and the ethical doctrines by which they are prompted, really evidence of an intelligent Creator? And can we really wish that the men who practised them should live for ever? The world in which we live can be understood as a result of muddle and accident; but if it is the outcome of a deliberate purpose, the purpose must have been that of a fiend. For my part, I find accident a less painful and more plausible hypothesis.

Brandon Sanderson foto

Související témata