„My trade is courage and atrocities.
I look at them and do not condemn.
I write things down the way they happened,
as near as can be remembered.
I don’t ask why, because it is mostly the same.
Wars happen because the ones who start them
think they can win.“

—  Margaret Atwood, kniha Morning in the Burned House

Morning in the Burned House (1995), The Loneliness of the Military Historian
Kontext: Instead of this, I tell
what I hope will pass as truth.
A blunt thing, not lovely.
The truth is seldom welcome,
especially at dinner,
though I am good at what I do.
My trade is courage and atrocities.
I look at them and do not condemn.
I write things down the way they happened,
as near as can be remembered.
I don’t ask why, because it is mostly the same.
Wars happen because the ones who start them
think they can win.

Převzato z Wikiquote. Poslední aktualizace 3. června 2021. Historie
Margaret Atwood foto
Margaret Atwood5
kanadská spisovatelka 1939

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