„But we are in a straitjacket, having to accept one or the other, when often some intermediate form would be better.“

—  Piet Hein, Context: Man is the animal that draws lines which he himself then stumbles over. In the whole pattern of civilization there have been two tendencies, one toward straight lines and rectangular patterns and one toward circular lines. There are reasons, mechanical and psychological, for both tendencies. Things made with straight lines fit well together and save space. And we can move easily — physically or mentally — around things made with round lines. But we are in a straitjacket, having to accept one or the other, when often some intermediate form would be better. As quoted in Scandinavian Review (2003), by the American-Scandinavian Foundation, p. 18
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Piet Hein2
puzzle designer, matematik, autor, básník 1577 - 1629
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