„Knowledge, then, is a system of transformations that become progressively adequate.“

—  Jean Piaget, Context: Knowing reality means constructing systems of transformations that correspond, more or less adequately, to reality. They are more or less isomorphic to transformations of reality. The transformational structures of which knowledge consists are not copies of the transformations in reality; they are simply possible isomorphic models among which experience can enable us to choose. Knowledge, then, is a system of transformations that become progressively adequate. Genetic Epistemology (1968) http://www.marxists.org/reference/subject/philosophy/works/fr/piaget.htm – First lecture
Jean Piaget foto
Jean Piaget1
švýcarský vývojový psycholog 1896 - 1980

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„In sum, social actors knowledgeably and actively use, interpret and implement rule systems. They also creatively reform and transform them. In such ways they bring about institutional innovation and transformation and shape the ‘deep structures’ of human history.“

—  Tom R. Burns American sociologist 1937
The shaping of social organization (1987), p. ix; as cited in: Simon Guy and John Henneberry (2000) " Understanding Urban Development Processes: Integrating the Economic and the Social in Property Research http://bentboolean.com/people/mm/private/SOA/548_DS/StrataProposal/research%20doct's/world_urban/UrbanDevtProperty.pdf," Urban Studies, Vol. 37, No. 13, 2399–2416, 2000.

W. Edwards Deming foto
Ravindra Prabhat foto

„If a Bloggers dies without transforming his/her knowledge to the new generation, the knowledge is meaningless. If an example if a witch could not transform her knowledge to anybody, she makes a hole where she dies.“

—  Ravindra Prabhat Hindi poet, scholar, journalist, novelist and short story writer 1969
"The South Asian Bloggers community celebrated the Third Bloggers Conference on 13-14-15th Sept. 2013 at Kathmandu in Nepal ." (13 September 2013) http://www.southasiatoday.org/2013/09/the-indian-bloggers-community.html

Yukio Mishima foto

„What transforms this world is — knowledge. Do you see what I mean? Nothing else can change anything in this world. Knowledge alone is capable of transforming the world, while at the same time leaving it exactly as it is. When you look at the world with knowledge, you realize that things are unchangeable and at the same time are constantly being transformed.“

—  Yukio Mishima, kniha The Temple of the Golden Pavilion
Context: What transforms this world is — knowledge. Do you see what I mean? Nothing else can change anything in this world. Knowledge alone is capable of transforming the world, while at the same time leaving it exactly as it is. When you look at the world with knowledge, you realize that things are unchangeable and at the same time are constantly being transformed. You may ask what good it does us. Let's put it this way — human beings possess the weapon of knowledge in order to make life bearable. For animals such things aren't necessary. Animals don't need knowledge or anything of the sort to make life bearable. But human beings do need something, and with knowledge they can make the very intolerableness of life a weapon, though at the same time that intolerableness is not reduced in the slightest. That's all there is to it. The Temple of the Golden Pavilion (1959).

„One advantage of exhibiting a hierarchy of systems in this way is that it gives us some idea of the present gaps in both theoretical and empirical knowledge. Adequate theoretical models extend up to about the fourth level, and not much beyond. Empirical knowledge is deficient at practically all levels.“

—  Kenneth E. Boulding British-American economist 1910 - 1993
1950s, General Systems Theory - The Skeleton of Science, 1956, p. 201, quoted in: John P. Cole, Cuchlaine A. M. King (1969) Quantitative geography: techniques and theories in geography. p. 575

W. Edwards Deming foto
Alfred North Whitehead foto
Paul Tillich foto

„In all existential knowledge both subject and object are transformed by the very act of knowing.“

—  Paul Tillich, kniha The Courage to Be
The Courage to Be (1952), Context: There are realms of reality or — more exactly — of abstraction from reality in which the most complete detachment is the adequate cognitive approach. Everything which can be expressed in terms of quantitative measurement has this character. But it is most inadequate to apply the same approach to reality in its infinite concreteness. A self which has become a matter of calculation and management has ceased to be a self. It has become a thing. You must participate in a self in order to know what it is. But by participating you change it. In all existential knowledge both subject and object are transformed by the very act of knowing. p. 124

Charles Baudelaire foto
Georges Braque foto

„In art progress consists not in extension but in the knowledge of its limits.“

—  Georges Braque French painter and sculptor 1882 - 1963
1908 - 1920, Quote from the review 'Nord-Sud', December 1917 a remark of Braque's writings, he wrote during his long convalescence in the hospital, after he was seriously wounded in World War 1, in 1915

Albert, Prince Consort foto

„Science discovers these laws of power, motion and transformation; industry applies them to raw matter which the earth yields us in abundance, but which becomes valuable only by knowledge.“

—  Albert, Prince Consort husband of Queen Victoria 1819 - 1861
Context: Nobody who has paid any attention to the peculiar features of our present era will doubt for a moment that we are living at a period of most wonderful transition which tends rapidly to the accomplishment that great end to which, indeed, all history points—the realization of the unity of mankind.... The distances which separated the different nations and parts of the globe are rapidly vanishing before the achievements of modern invention, and we can traverse them with incredible ease; the languages of all nations are known, and their acquirement placed within the reach of everybody; thought is communicated with the rapidity and even by the power of lightning... The knowledge acquired becomes at once the property of all of the community at large... no sooner is a discovery or invention made, than it is already improved upon and surpassed by competing efforts: the products of all quarters of the globe are placed at our disposal, and we have only to choose which is the best and the cheapest for our purposes, and the powers of production are entrusted to the stimulus of competition and capital.... Science discovers these laws of power, motion and transformation; industry applies them to raw matter which the earth yields us in abundance, but which becomes valuable only by knowledge. Inaugural Address of the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations, London (1851).

Johann Gottlieb Fichte foto

„Upon the progress of knowledge the whole progress of the human race is immediately dependent: he who retards that, hinders this also.“

—  Johann Gottlieb Fichte German philosopher 1762 - 1814
The Vocation of the Scholar (1794), Context: Upon the progress of knowledge the whole progress of the human race is immediately dependent: he who retards that, hinders this also. And he who hinders this, —what character does he assume towards his age and posterity? Louder than with a thousand voices, by his actions he proclaims into the deafened ear of the world present and to come —"As long as I live at least, the men around me shall not become wiser or better; — for in their progress I too, notwithstanding all my efforts to the contrary, should be dragged forward in some direction; and this I detest I will not become more enlightened, — I will not become nobler. Darkness and perversion are my elements, and I will summon all my powers together that I may not be dislodged from them." Αs translated by William Smith, in The Popular Works of Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1889), Vol. I, Lecture IV, p. 188.

Alexis De Tocqueville foto

„In democratic countries knowledge of how to combine is the mother of all other forms of knowledge; on its progress depends that of all the others.“

—  Alexis De Tocqueville, kniha Democracy in America
Democracy in America, Volume II (1840), Book Two, Context: Americans of all ages, all stations of life, and all types of disposition are forever forming associations... In democratic countries knowledge of how to combine is the mother of all other forms of knowledge; on its progress depends that of all the others. Book Two, Chapter V.

„Whatever the progress of human knowledge, there will always be room for ignorance, hence for chance and probability.“

—  Émile Borel
Quels que soient les progrès des connaissances humaines, il y aura toujours place pour l'ignorance et par suite pour le hasard et la probabilité. [Emile Borel, Le hasard, Librairie Félix Alcan, 1914, 12-13]

David O. McKay foto

„An Unsatisfied Appetite for Knowledge Means Progress and Is the State of a Normal Mind“

—  David O. McKay President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 1873 - 1970
Title of Valedictorian address (1897)

James Clerk Maxwell foto

„In every branch of knowledge the progress is proportional to the amount of facts on which to build“

—  James Clerk Maxwell Scottish physicist 1831 - 1879
Context: In every branch of knowledge the progress is proportional to the amount of facts on which to build, and therefore to the facility of obtaining data. Letter to Lewis Campbell (9 November 1851) in Ch. 6 : Undergraduate Life At Cambridge October 1850 to January 1854 — ÆT. 19-22, p. 159

Peter Kropotkin foto

„What if that knowledge — and only that — should become the possession of all? Would not science itself progress in leaps, and cause mankind to make strides in production, invention, and social creation, of which we are hardly in a condition now to measure the speed?“

—  Peter Kropotkin Russian zoologist, evolutionary theorist, philosopher, scientist, revolutionary, economist, activist, geographer, writer 1842 - 1921
Context: Belief in an ice-cap reaching Middle Europe was at that time rank heresy; but before my eyes a grand picture was rising, and I wanted to draw it, with the thousands of details I saw in it; to use it as a key to the present distribution of floras and faunas; to open new horizons for geology and physical geography. But what right had I to these highest joys, when all around me was nothing but misery and struggle for a mouldy bit of bread; when whatsoever I should spend to enable me to live in that world of higher emotions must needs be taken from the very mouths of those who grew the wheat and had not bread enough for their children? From somebody's mouth it must be taken, because the aggregate production of mankind remains still so low. Knowledge is an immense power. Man must know. But we already know much! What if that knowledge — and only that — should become the possession of all? Would not science itself progress in leaps, and cause mankind to make strides in production, invention, and social creation, of which we are hardly in a condition now to measure the speed? Memoirs of a Revolutionist (1899) http://dwardmac.pitzer.edu/anarchist_archives/kropotkin/memoirs/memoirstoc.html Part IV, Sect. 3 http://dwardmac.pitzer.edu/anarchist_archives/kropotkin/memoirs/memoirs4_3.html

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