„I think I think harder, think more than other people do, than other scientists.“

—  Linus Pauling, Context: I've been asked from time to time, "How does it happen that you have made so many discoveries? Are you smarter than other scientists?" And my answer has been that I am sure that I am not smarter than other scientists. I don't have any precise evaluation of my IQ, but to the extent that psychologists have said that my IQ is about 160, I recognize that there are one hundred thousand or more people in the United States that have IQs higher than that. So I have said that I think I think harder, think more than other people do, than other scientists. That is, for years, almost all of my thinking was about science and scientific problems that I was interested in. Interview at Big Sur, California http://web.archive.org/web/20101212203431/http://achievement.org/autodoc/page/pau0int-3 (11 November 1990).
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Linus Pauling1
americký vědec 1901 - 1994
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—  Meryl Streep American actress 1949
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—  François de La Rochefoucauld French author of maxims and memoirs 1613 - 1680
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„I do not oscillate in Emerson's rainbow, but prefer rather to hang myself in mine own halter than swing in any other man's swing. Yet I think Emerson is more than a brilliant fellow.“

—  Herman Melville American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet 1819 - 1891
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