„Be there, for once and all,
Severed great minds from small,
Announced to each his station in the Past!“

—  Robert Browning, Rabbi ben Ezra

Zdroj: Dramatis Personae (1864), Rabbi Ben Ezra, Line 121.
Kontext: Be there, for once and all,
Severed great minds from small,
Announced to each his station in the Past!
Was I, the world arraigned,
Were they, my soul disdained,
Right? Let age speak the truth and give us peace at last!
Now, who shall arbitrate?
Ten men love what I hate,
Shun what I follow, slight what I receive;
Ten, who in ears and eyes
Match me: we all surmise,
They this thing, I that: whom shall my soul believe?

Převzato z Wikiquote. Poslední aktualizace 3. června 2021. Historie
Robert Browning foto
Robert Browning12
anglický básník a dramatik viktoriánské éry 1812 - 1889

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