„Sometimes they are as anxious to offer moral justifications for the brutalities from which they suffer as for those which they commit.“

—  Reinhold Niebuhr, kniha Moral Man and Immoral Society

Zdroj: Moral Man and Immoral Society (1932), pp. 8-9
Kontext: The inevitable hypocrisy, which is associated with the all the collective activities of the human race, springs chiefly from this source: that individuals have a moral code which makes the actions of collective man an outrage to their conscience. They therefore invent romantic and moral interpretations of the real facts, preferring to obscure rather than reveal the true character of their collective behavior. Sometimes they are as anxious to offer moral justifications for the brutalities from which they suffer as for those which they commit. The fact that the hypocrisy of man's group behavior... expresses itself not only in terms of self-justification but in terms of moral justification of human behavior in general, symbolizes one of the tragedies of the human spirit: its inability to conform its collective life to its individual ideals. As individuals, men believe they ought to love and serve each other and establish justice between each other. As racial, economic and national groups they take for themselves, whatever their power can command.

Převzato z Wikiquote. Poslední aktualizace 3. června 2021. Historie
Reinhold Niebuhr foto
Reinhold Niebuhr5
americký bohoslovec 1892 - 1971

Podobné citáty

Ludovico Ariosto foto

„Want is a master which can sometimes make
A man the gravest sacrilege commit.“

—  Ludovico Ariosto, kniha Orlando Furioso

Perché il bisogno a dispogliar gli altari
ra' l'uom talvolta, che sel trova avere.
Canto XLIII, stanza 90 (tr. B. Reynolds)
Orlando Furioso (1532)

„The policy of wisdom is to use that method which involves a minimum of suffering, and which offers a maximum of redemption.“

—  Kirby Page American clergyman 1890 - 1957

The Personality of Jesus (1932)
Kontext: None of the three ways of dealing with social injustice can entirely prevent or remove human suffering. Resistance by violence tends to increase and intensify suffering; inaction or failure to exert effective restraint perpetuates the misery of the victims of crime or exploitation; non-violent coercion likewise often results in suffering. The policy of wisdom is to use that method which involves a minimum of suffering, and which offers a maximum of redemption.

Paul Éluard foto

„His fables so brutally imposed, sweated by heart. Their morality is a prison which I don't want to penetrate anymore.“

—  Paul Éluard French poet 1895 - 1952

Paul Éluard on La Fontaine
Attributed by: Ivry, Benjamin (1996). Francis Poulenc, p. 125, 20th-Century Composers series. Phaidon Press Limited. ISBN 071483503X.

Sri Aurobindo foto

„A principled commitment to democracy offers a way out of this bind which protagonists on both sides of the debate appear not to have noticed.“

—  Ian Shapiro American political theorist 1956

"Three ways to Be a democrat" (1994), reprinted in Democracy's Place (1996).

Émile Durkheim foto
Emil M. Cioran foto

„Maybe suffering has no more justification than life.“

—  Emil M. Cioran Romanian philosopher and essayist 1911 - 1995

On the Heights of Despair (1934)

Henri Barbusse foto
David Brin foto
Edmund Burke foto
Ayn Rand foto

„There can be no justification for choosing any part of that which one knows to be evil.“

—  Ayn Rand Russian-American novelist and philosopher 1905 - 1982

Zdroj: The Virtue of Selfishness: A New Concept of Egoism

Steven Erikson foto
Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury foto

„On general grounds I object to Parliament trying to regulate private morality in matters which only affects the person who commits the offence.“

—  Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury British politician 1830 - 1903

Letter to Sir Henry Peek http://wist.info/salisbury-lord/5899/ (1888)
1880s

John Kenneth Galbraith foto

„The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness.“

—  John Kenneth Galbraith American economist and diplomat 1908 - 2006

“Stop the Madness,” Interview with Rupert Cornwell, Toronto Globe and Mail (6 July 2002) (see http://wist.info/galbraith-john-kenneth/7463/ )

Michel Foucault foto
Thomas Brooks foto
Felix Adler foto

„There may be, and there ought to be, progress in the moral sphere. The moral truths which we have inherited from the past need to be expanded and restated.“

—  Felix Adler German American professor of political and social ethics, rationalist, and lecturer 1851 - 1933

Section 9 : Ethical Outlook
Founding Address (1876), Life and Destiny (1913)
Kontext: There may be, and there ought to be, progress in the moral sphere. The moral truths which we have inherited from the past need to be expanded and restated. In times of misfortune we require for our support something of which the truth is beyond all question, in which we can put an implicit trust, " though the heavens should fall." A merely borrowed belief is, at such time, like a rotten plank across a raging torrent. The moment we step upon it, it gives way beneath our feet.

Chris Hedges foto

Související témata