„You have to practice quite hard, like you do with any art form. Religion is hard work.“

— Karen Armstrong, Context: It's not easy to talk about transcendence, just as it's not easy to play or listen to a late Beethoven quartet … You have to practice quite hard, like you do with any art form. Religion is hard work.

Karen Armstrong7
autorka a pedagožka z Velké Británie 1944
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