„He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.“

Lectures on the English Poets http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16209/16209.txt (1818), Lecture I, "On Poetry in General"
Kontext: Poetry is the universal language which the heart holds with nature and itself. He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.

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William Hazlitt9
anglický spisovatel, divadelní kritik, sociální komentátor … 1778 - 1830

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