„I felt that it was an unnecessary loss of civilian life…“

On the use of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as quoted by his widow, who also stated that he had "always felt badly over the dropping of that bomb because he said we had Japan beaten already" in The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture of an American Myth (1995) by Gar Alperovitz
Kontext: I felt that it was an unnecessary loss of civilian life... We had them beaten. They hadn't enough food, they couldn't do anything.

Převzato z Wikiquote. Poslední aktualizace 3. června 2021. Historie
Chester William Nimitz foto
Chester William Nimitz1
admirál námořnictva Spojených států 1885 - 1966

Podobné citáty

Kiran Desai foto

„Could fulfillment ever be felt as deeply as loss?“

—  Kiran Desai, kniha The Inheritance of Loss

Zdroj: The Inheritance of Loss

„Unnecessary customs live a brutally short life in America.“

—  Wilfrid Sheed English-American novelist and essayist 1930 - 2011

"Now That Men Can Cry..." (1977), p. 290
The Good Word & Other Words (1978)

Christina Baker Kline foto
Martin Amis foto

„Like all "acts of terrorism" (easily and unsubjectively defined as organised violence against civilians), September 11 was an attack on morality: we felt a general deficit.“

—  Martin Amis Welsh novelist 1949

"The Palace of the End" (2003)
Kontext: Like all "acts of terrorism" (easily and unsubjectively defined as organised violence against civilians), September 11 was an attack on morality: we felt a general deficit. Who, on September 10, was expecting by Christmastime to be reading unscandalised editorials in the Herald Tribune about the pros and cons of using torture on captured "enemy combatants"? Who expected Britain to renounce the doctrine of nuclear no-first-use? Terrorism undermines morality. Then, too, it undermines reason. … No, you wouldn't expect such a massive world-historical jolt, which will reverberate for centuries, to be effortlessly absorbed. But the suspicion remains that America is not behaving rationally — that America is behaving like someone still in shock.

John C. Maxwell foto
George F. Kennan foto

„Here, for the first time, I felt an unshakable conviction that no momentary military advantage — even if such could have been calculated to exist — could have justified this stupendous, careless destruction of civilian life and of material values, built up laboriously by human hands over the course of centuries for purposes having nothing to do with war.“

—  George F. Kennan American advisor, diplomat, political scientist and historian 1904 - 2005

Written in regard to the Allied destruction of Hamburg and other German cities, p. 437
Memoirs 1925 - 1950 (1967), Germany
Kontext: Here, for the first time, I felt an unshakable conviction that no momentary military advantage — even if such could have been calculated to exist — could have justified this stupendous, careless destruction of civilian life and of material values, built up laboriously by human hands over the course of centuries for purposes having nothing to do with war. Least of all could it have been justified by the screaming non sequitur: "They did it to us." And it suddenly appeared to me that in these ruins there was an unanswerable symbolism which we in the West could not afford to ignore. If the Western world was really going to make a pretense of a higher moral departure point — of greater sympathy and understanding for the human being as God made him, as expressed not only in himself but in the things he had wrought and cared about — then it had to learn to fight its wars morally as well as militarily, or not fight them at all; for moral principles were a part of its strength. Shorn of this strength, it was no longer itself; its victories were not real victories; and the best it would accomplish in the long run would be to pull down the temple over its own head. The military would stamp this as naïve; they would say that war is war, that when you're in it you fight with every means you have, or go down in defeat. But if that is the case, then there rests upon Western civilization, bitter as this may be, the obligation to be militarily stronger than its adversaries by a margin sufficient to enable it to dispense with those means which can stave off defeat only at the cost of undermining victory.

John Milton foto
Lois McMaster Bujold foto
Norman Cousins foto

„Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is what dies within us while we live.“

—  Norman Cousins American journalist 1915 - 1990

Quoted in History of Sikh Struggles (1989) by Gurmit Singh, p. 189.

Tupac Shakur foto

„Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is what dies inside while still alive. Never surrender.“

—  Tupac Shakur rapper and actor 1971 - 1996

Varianta: Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is what dies inside while still alive. Never surrender.

F. Scott Fitzgerald foto
Igor Stravinsky foto
Fidel Castro foto
José Saramago foto
Muammar Gaddafi foto

„I think it is peaceful and civil … civilian activity for investigation of space, or something like this.“

—  Muammar Gaddafi Libyan revolutionary, politician and political theorist 1942 - 2011

About a program to develop a rocket. In HyperNormalization. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fh2cDKyFdyU&t=59m54s
Interviews

Benjamín Netanyahu foto

„The difference between us is that we're using missile defense to protect our civilians and they're using their civilians to protect their missiles.“

—  Benjamín Netanyahu Israeli prime minister 1949

Interview on CBS' "Face the Nation" 12 July 2014 http://www.cbsnews.com/news/can-israel-avoid-civilian-deaths-in-gaza-offensive/. Comparing Israeli forces to Hamas militants.
2010s, 2014

John Irving foto

Související témata