„It is almost impossible to translate verbally and well at the same time“

Works of John Dryden (1803) as quoted by P. Fleury Mottelay in William Gilbert of Colchester (1893)
Kontext: It is almost impossible to translate verbally and well at the same time; for the Latin (a most severe and compendious language) often expresses that in one word which either the barbarity or the narrowness of modern tongues cannot supply in more.... But since every language is so full of its own proprieties that what is beautiful in one is often barbarous, nay, sometimes nonsense, in another, it would be unreasonable to limit a translator to the narrow compass of his author's words; it is enough if he choose out some expression which does not vitiate the sense.

John Dryden foto
John Dryden5
anglický básník a dramatik 1631 - 1700

Podobné citáty

William Carlos Williams foto

„Translation: Though life seems painful, at the same time it is wonderful“

—  Ritsuko Okazaki Japanese singer 1959 - 2004

空色(Sorairo), Siki
Lyrics
Originál: (ja) 生きるのは苦しいの  同じくらい素敵なの

Stanisław Lem foto
Antonin Artaud foto
Mario Vargas Llosa foto
William Cowper foto
George Gershwin foto
Mignon McLaughlin foto
Rahul Dravid foto
Franz Kafka foto
Lee Iacocca foto
Ralph Waldo Emerson foto

„Men suffer all their life long, under the foolish superstition that they can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated by any one but himself, as for a thing to be and not to be at the same time.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

1840s, Essays: First Series (1841), Compensation
Kontext: Men suffer all their life long, under the foolish superstition that they can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated by any one but himself, as for a thing to be and not to be at the same time. There is a third silent party to all our bargains. The nature and soul of things takes on itself the guaranty of the fulfilment of every contract, so that honest service cannot come to loss. If you serve an ungrateful master, serve him the more. Put God in your debt. Every stroke shall be repaid. The longer the payment is withholden, the better for you; for compound interest on compound interest is the rate and usage of this exchequer.
The history of persecution is a history of endeavours to cheat nature, to make water run up hill, to twist a rope of sand. It makes no difference whether the actors be many or one, a tyrant or a mob. A mob is a society of bodies voluntarily bereaving themselves of reason, and traversing its work. The mob is man voluntarily descending to the nature of the beast. Its fit hour of activity is night. Its actions are insane like its whole constitution. It persecutes a principle; it would whip a right; it would tar and feather justice, by inflicting fire and outrage upon the houses and persons of those who have these. It resembles the prank of boys, who run with fire-engines to put out the ruddy aurora streaming to the stars. The inviolate spirit turns their spite against the wrongdoers. The martyr cannot be dishonored. Every lash inflicted is a tongue of fame; every prison, a more illustrious abode; every burned book or house enlightens the world; every suppressed or expunged word reverberates through the earth from side to side. Hours of sanity and consideration are always arriving to communities, as to individuals, when the truth is seen, and the martyrs are justified.
Thus do all things preach the indifferency of circumstances. The man is all. Every thing has two sides, a good and an evil. Every advantage has its tax. I learn to be content. But the doctrine of compensation is not the doctrine of indifferency. The thoughtless say, on hearing these representations, — What boots it to do well? there is one event to good and evil; if I gain any good, I must pay for it; if I lose any good, I gain some other; all actions are indifferent.
There is a deeper fact in the soul than compensation, to wit, its own nature. The soul is not a compensation, but a life. The soul is. Under all this running sea of circumstance, whose waters ebb and flow with perfect balance, lies the aboriginal abyss of real Being. Essence, or God, is not a relation, or a part, but the whole. Being is the vast affirmative, excluding negation, self-balanced, and swallowing up all relations, parts, and times within itself. Nature, truth, virtue, are the influx from thence. Vice is the absence or departure of the same.

Winston S. Churchill foto
Nikolaj Velimirović foto

„Translation: We are waiting for Christ, and not a better time.“

—  Nikolaj Velimirović Serbian bishop and saint 1880 - 1956

Ми чекамо Христа, а не боље време.
Prayerful songs http://www.svetosavlje.org/biblioteka/vlNikolaj/PesmeMolitvene/Nikolaj100219.htm

Letitia Elizabeth Landon foto

„The Little Boy’s Bed-Time See under Translations“

—  Letitia Elizabeth Landon English poet and novelist 1802 - 1838

Traits and Trials of Early Life (1836)

Northrop Frye foto

„The first thing that confronts us in studying verbal structures is that they are arranged sequentially, and have to be read or listened to in time.“

—  Northrop Frye Canadian literary critic and literary theorist 1912 - 1991

Chapter Two, p. 31
"Quotes", The Great Code: The Bible and Literature (1982)

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn foto
Robbie Williams foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

x