John Wesley citáty

John Wesley foto
3   8

John Wesley

Datum narození: 17. červen 1703
Datum úmrtí: 2. březen 1791
Další jména: 約翰衛斯理

Reklama

John Wesley [wezli] byl anglický křesťanský teolog, jeden z prvních vůdců metodistického hnutí v 40. letech 18. století.

Pocházel z tradiční křesťanské rodiny, sám se po studiích na Oxfordské univerzitě stal pastorem anglikánské církve. Zde však nenašel uspokojení a osloven moravskými bratry založil metodistické hnutí v Anglii. To se rychle rozšířilo do ostatních anglicky mluvících zemí. Církve vycházející z této tradice dnes sdružuje Světová metodistická konference.

Podobní autoři

Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus foto
Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus4
křesťanský bohoslovec
Klement Alexandrijský foto
Klement Alexandrijský6
křesťanský bohoslovec
Jakob Böhme foto
Jakob Böhme1
německý křesťanský mystik a teolog
Jonathan Edwards foto
Jonathan Edwards2
křesťanský kazatel, filozof a teolog
 Pavel z Tarsu foto
Pavel z Tarsu10
raně křesťanský apoštol a misionář
Rick Warren foto
Rick Warren13
křesťanský náboženský vůdce
John Bunyan foto
John Bunyan14
anglický křesťanský spisovatel a kazatel
Aurelius Augustinus foto
Aurelius Augustinus62
raně křesťanský teolog a filozof
Gilbert Keith Chesterton foto
Gilbert Keith Chesterton131
anglický romanopisec a křesťanský obhájce
Maurice Blondel foto
Maurice Blondel4
francouzský filozof

Citáty John Wesley

Reklama

„Never dream of forcing men into the ways of God. Think yourself, and let think.“

—  John Wesley
Sermons on Several Occasions (1771), Context: Beware you are not a fiery, persecuting enthusiast. Do not imagine that God has called you (just contrary to the spirit of Him you style your Master) to destroy men’s lives, and not to save them. Never dream of forcing men into the ways of God. Think yourself, and let think. Use no constraint in matters of religion. Even those who are farthest out of the way never compel to come in by any other means than reason, truth, and love. Sermon 37 "The Nature of Enthusiasm"

„If you will avoid all bigotry, go on. In every instance of this kind, whatever the instrument be, acknowledge the finger of God. And not only acknowledge, but rejoice in his work, and praise his name with thanksgiving. Encourage whomsoever God is pleased to employ, to give himself wholly up thereto. Speak well of him wheresoever you are; defend his character and his mission.“

—  John Wesley
Sermons on Several Occasions (1771), Context: In order to examine ourselves thoroughly, let the case be proposed in the strongest manner. What, if I were to see a Papist, an Arian, a Socinian casting out devils? If I did, I could not forbid even him, without convicting myself of bigotry. Yea, if it could be supposed that I should see a Jew, a Deist, or a Turk, doing the same, were I to forbid him either directly or indirectly, I should be no better than a bigot still. O stand clear of this! But be not content with not forbidding any that casts out devils. It is well to go thus far; but do not stop here. If you will avoid all bigotry, go on. In every instance of this kind, whatever the instrument be, acknowledge the finger of God. And not only acknowledge, but rejoice in his work, and praise his name with thanksgiving. Encourage whomsoever God is pleased to employ, to give himself wholly up thereto. Speak well of him wheresoever you are; defend his character and his mission. Enlarge, as far as you can, his sphere of action; show him all kindness in word and deed; and cease not to cry to God in his behalf, that he may save both himself and them that hear him. I need add but one caution: Think not the bigotry of another is any excuse for your own. It is not impossible, that one who casts out devils himself, may yet forbid you so to do. You may observe, this is the very case mentioned in the text. The Apostles forbade another to do what they did themselves. But beware of retorting. It is not your part to return evil for evil. Another’s not observing the direction of our Lord, is no reason why you should neglect it. Nay, but let him have all the bigotry to himself. If he forbid you, do not you forbid him. Rather labour, and watch, and pray the more, to confirm your love toward him. If he speak all manner of evil of you, speak all manner of good (that is true) of him. Sermon 38 "A Caution against Bigotry http://www.ccel.org/ccel/wesley/sermons.v.xxxviii.html

„Do all the good you can,
By all the means you can,
In all the ways you can,
In all the places you can,
At all the times you can,
To all the people you can,
As long as you ever can.“

—  John Wesley, John Wesley
Disputed, Statement commonly known as "John Wesley's Rule" Variant Do all the good you can, in all the ways you can, to all the souls you can, in every place you can, at all the times you can, with all the zeal you can, as long as ever you can. According to Richard Heitzenrater, Professor of Church History and Wesleyan Studies at Duke Divinity School, there is no evidence that John Wesley ever wrote the rule that is attributed to him. In the sermon titled "The Use of Money" Wesley said, "Employ whatever God has entrusted you with in doing good, all possible good, in every possible kind and degree . . . to all men." This sermon is in the collection titled "Wesley's Standard Sermons." They are called "standard" because all Methodist preachers were instructed to read them and use them in interpreting the Christian faith.

„Beware, lastly, of imagining you shall obtain the end without using the means conducive to it.“

—  John Wesley
Sermons on Several Occasions (1771), Context: Beware, lastly, of imagining you shall obtain the end without using the means conducive to it. God can give the end without any means at all; but you have no reason to think He will. Therefore constantly and carefully use all those means which He has appointed to be the ordinary channels of His grace. Use every means which either reason or Scripture recommends, as conducive (through the free love of God in Christ) either to the obtaining or increasing any of the gifts of God. Thus expect a daily growth in that pure and holy religion which the world always did, and always will, call “enthusiasm;” but which, to all who are saved from real enthusiasm, from merely nominal Christianity, is “the wisdom of God, and the power of God;” the glorious image of the Most High; “righteousness and peace;” a “fountain of living water, springing up into everlasting life!” Sermon 37 "The Nature of Enthusiasm"

„Think not the bigotry of another is any excuse for your own.“

—  John Wesley
Sermons on Several Occasions (1771), Context: In order to examine ourselves thoroughly, let the case be proposed in the strongest manner. What, if I were to see a Papist, an Arian, a Socinian casting out devils? If I did, I could not forbid even him, without convicting myself of bigotry. Yea, if it could be supposed that I should see a Jew, a Deist, or a Turk, doing the same, were I to forbid him either directly or indirectly, I should be no better than a bigot still. O stand clear of this! But be not content with not forbidding any that casts out devils. It is well to go thus far; but do not stop here. If you will avoid all bigotry, go on. In every instance of this kind, whatever the instrument be, acknowledge the finger of God. And not only acknowledge, but rejoice in his work, and praise his name with thanksgiving. Encourage whomsoever God is pleased to employ, to give himself wholly up thereto. Speak well of him wheresoever you are; defend his character and his mission. Enlarge, as far as you can, his sphere of action; show him all kindness in word and deed; and cease not to cry to God in his behalf, that he may save both himself and them that hear him. I need add but one caution: Think not the bigotry of another is any excuse for your own. It is not impossible, that one who casts out devils himself, may yet forbid you so to do. You may observe, this is the very case mentioned in the text. The Apostles forbade another to do what they did themselves. But beware of retorting. It is not your part to return evil for evil. Another’s not observing the direction of our Lord, is no reason why you should neglect it. Nay, but let him have all the bigotry to himself. If he forbid you, do not you forbid him. Rather labour, and watch, and pray the more, to confirm your love toward him. If he speak all manner of evil of you, speak all manner of good (that is true) of him. Sermon 38 "A Caution against Bigotry http://www.ccel.org/ccel/wesley/sermons.v.xxxviii.html

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„But as to all opinions which do not strike at the root of Christianity, we think and let think.“

—  John Wesley
General sources, Context: The distinguishing marks of a Methodist are not his opinions of any sort. His assenting to this or that scheme of Religion, his embracing any particular set of notions, his espousing the judgment of one man or of another, are all quite wide of the point. Whosoever therefore imagines, that a Methodist is a man of such or such an opinion, is grossly ignorant of the whole affair; he mistakes the truth totally. We believe indeed, that all Scripture is given by the inspiration of God, and herein we are distinguished from Jews, Turks, and Infidels. We believe the written word of God to be the only and sufficient rule, both of Christian faith and practice; and herein we are fundamentally distinguished from those of the Romish church. We believe Christ to be the eternal, supreme God; and herein we are distinguished from the Socinians and Arians. But as to all opinions which do not strike at the root of Christianity, we think and let think. So that whatsoever they are, whether right or wrong, they are no distinguishing marks of a; Methodist. "The Character of a Methodist" (1739); in The Works of the Rev. John Wesley in Ten Volumes (1826), Volume IV, p. 407; A portion of this is commonly quoted as "Think and let think.".

„If he forbid you, do not you forbid him. Rather labour, and watch, and pray the more, to confirm your love toward him. If he speak all manner of evil of you, speak all manner of good (that is true) of him.“

—  John Wesley
Sermons on Several Occasions (1771), Context: In order to examine ourselves thoroughly, let the case be proposed in the strongest manner. What, if I were to see a Papist, an Arian, a Socinian casting out devils? If I did, I could not forbid even him, without convicting myself of bigotry. Yea, if it could be supposed that I should see a Jew, a Deist, or a Turk, doing the same, were I to forbid him either directly or indirectly, I should be no better than a bigot still. O stand clear of this! But be not content with not forbidding any that casts out devils. It is well to go thus far; but do not stop here. If you will avoid all bigotry, go on. In every instance of this kind, whatever the instrument be, acknowledge the finger of God. And not only acknowledge, but rejoice in his work, and praise his name with thanksgiving. Encourage whomsoever God is pleased to employ, to give himself wholly up thereto. Speak well of him wheresoever you are; defend his character and his mission. Enlarge, as far as you can, his sphere of action; show him all kindness in word and deed; and cease not to cry to God in his behalf, that he may save both himself and them that hear him. I need add but one caution: Think not the bigotry of another is any excuse for your own. It is not impossible, that one who casts out devils himself, may yet forbid you so to do. You may observe, this is the very case mentioned in the text. The Apostles forbade another to do what they did themselves. But beware of retorting. It is not your part to return evil for evil. Another’s not observing the direction of our Lord, is no reason why you should neglect it. Nay, but let him have all the bigotry to himself. If he forbid you, do not you forbid him. Rather labour, and watch, and pray the more, to confirm your love toward him. If he speak all manner of evil of you, speak all manner of good (that is true) of him. Sermon 38 "A Caution against Bigotry http://www.ccel.org/ccel/wesley/sermons.v.xxxviii.html

„I look on all the world as my parish;“

—  John Wesley
General sources, Context: I look on all the world as my parish; thus far I mean, that, in whatever part of it I am, I judge it meet, right, and my bounden duty, to declare unto all that are willing to hear, the glad tidings of salvation. Journal (11 June 1739)

„The longer I live, the larger allowances I make for human infirmities.“

—  John Wesley
General sources, Context: The longer I live, the larger allowances I make for human infirmities. I exact more from myself, and less from others. Go thou and do likewise! Letter to Reverend Samuel Furley (25 Janurary 1762), Published in The Life and Times of the Rev. John Wesley, M. A., Founder of the Methodists (1872) by Luke Tyerman, p. 451.

„Passion and prejudice govern the world; only under the name of reason.“

—  John Wesley
General sources, Context: Passion and prejudice govern the world; only under the name of reason. It is our part, by religion and reason joined, to counteract them all we can. Letter to John Benson (5 October 1770); published in Wesley's Select Letters (1837), p. 207

„I deny that villany is ever necessary. It is impossible that it should ever be necessary for any reasonable creature to violate all the laws of justice, mercy, and truth. No circumstances can make it necessary for a man to burst in sunder all the ties of humanity.“

—  John Wesley
Thoughts Upon Slavery (1774), Context: I deny that villany is ever necessary. It is impossible that it should ever be necessary for any reasonable creature to violate all the laws of justice, mercy, and truth. No circumstances can make it necessary for a man to burst in sunder all the ties of humanity. It can never be necessary for a rational being to sink himself below a brute. A man can be under no necessity of degrading himself into a wolf. The absurdity of the supposition is so glaring, that one would wonder any one can help seeing it.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Today's anniversary
Paul Allen foto
Paul Allen2
americký podnikatel 1953 - 2018
Peter Konwitschny foto
Peter Konwitschny2
německý divadelní režisér 1945
Božena Němcová foto
Božena Němcová44
česká spisovatelka 1820 - 1862
George Orwell foto
George Orwell80
anglický spisovatel a novinář 1903 - 1950
Dalších 55 dnešních výročí
Podobní autoři
Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus foto
Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus4
křesťanský bohoslovec
Klement Alexandrijský foto
Klement Alexandrijský6
křesťanský bohoslovec
Jakob Böhme foto
Jakob Böhme1
německý křesťanský mystik a teolog
Jonathan Edwards foto
Jonathan Edwards2
křesťanský kazatel, filozof a teolog
 Pavel z Tarsu foto
Pavel z Tarsu10
raně křesťanský apoštol a misionář